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Hal Rogers Awarded Wings of Liberty

September 19, 2014

Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (R-Ky.), was awarded the prestigious Wings of Liberty Award Thursday, September 18. The award recognises his longtime support of the aerospace and defense industry.

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AIA Praises Passage of FY15 Short-Term Continuing Resolution

September 19, 2014

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey commending passage of the FY2015 Continuing Resolution which will keep the government operating through December 11, 2014

Arlington, Va. – Today, the Aerospace Industries Association praises the strong bipartisan passage of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, a Continuing Resolution (CR) which will keep the government running until December 11th.

While this short-term measure is important, we strongly encourage Congress to come together after the elections to negotiate an omnibus appropriations bill to fund the entire federal government and not pass another CR. Without these appropriations bills, the federal government must live off last years’ budgets and under significant restrictions.  Our industry could not function under those constraints and neither should the civilian workforce and the men and women who wear our nation’s uniform every day.   Our industry and economy also suffer since CRs do not allow new programs to get started, production quantities to increase beyond the prior year level, or contain authority to enter into cost-saving multi-year contracts.

While Congress has also reauthorized the Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank for a nine month extension, the hard work remains.  U.S. manufacturers – along with their robust workforce – deserve to compete on a level playing field against our foreign competitors who are trying to take America's jobs.  A long term extension of the Ex-Im Bank would provide much needed certainty to an industry that plays a critical role in both our national and economic security.

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AIA Presents 2014 Wings of Liberty Award to Representative Harold “Hal” Rogers

September 18, 2014

Left to Right: Marion C. Blakey, President and CEO, AIA, Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers, Michael Strianese, AIA Chairman, and Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer, L-3 Communications

Arlington, Va. — The Aerospace Industries Association is presenting its prestigious Wings of Liberty Award September 18 to Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (R-Ky.), in recognition of his longtime support of the aerospace and defense industry.

Rep. Rogers is Chairman and a 30-year member of the House Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for oversight and passage of the annual appropriation bills that provide over $1 trillion annually to the federal government.  Rogers has served on the Defense subcomittee, and as chairman of the Transportation, Commerce, Science, Justice and the Homeland Security subcommittees.  During his tenure in office, he has been a strong advocate for national and homeland security, civil aviation and space programs.

“The Wings of Liberty is our industry’s highest award,” said AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey.  “It is an honor to present it to Congressman Rogers who has been a tremendous leader of our cause and richly deserving of this year’s award. Through his leadership of Appropriations, he has served the House with great distinction and has always put national security first.”

In response to receiving the Wings of Liberty Award, Rep. Rogers, said, “I am honored to receive the Wings of Liberty award from the Aerospace Industries Association. Our nation is recognized as the global leader in defense systems and aerospace engineering due to the daily work of the innovative members of this industry. At a time when terrorist groups are growing in number and boldness around the world, we must continue to maintain the very best national defense efforts, which are heavily supported through aerospace technology. I commend the continued ingenuity and leadership of AIA, allowing this nation to be on the forefront of defense, air travel, and communication.”

The Wings of Liberty award is presented annually to a member of Congress who has made significant contributions to help bolster aerospace and national defense. The award, which embodies the spirit of America and the drive to achieve any dream, will be made at a reception on Capitol Hill, one of several events celebrating National Aerospace Week. Past honorees include Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-Calif.), Senator Patty Murray (D-Wash.), Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Wash.), and Senator Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii).

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Secretary Pritzker Applauds National Aerospace Week

September 16, 2014

Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker applauds the fifth anniversary of National Aerospace Week and recognizes the significant contributions our industry makes to both U.S. national security and the economy. 

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Moving Toward Rational FAA Regulation of Unmanned Aircraft Systems

September 15, 2014

Even though Congress has mandated a deadline in 2015 for integrating unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into U.S. airspace, that deadline will probably not be met. However, increasing attention from many sources outside the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is focused on how safety concerns will be addressed.

Typically, the safety conversation boils down to how to avoid collisions between conventionally piloted aircraft and UAS, and UAS crash landings. That’s a fair departure point for thoughtful discourse, but as someone who had responsibility for safety at the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA, I believe we need to consider the broader picture. UAS have tremendous life-saving potential when lost people need to be found; when wildfires develop; when tornadoes hit; and when power lines, oil rigs and bridges need close inspection. Almost every day, there is news of a new idea about how to gain valuable social benefits from this technology without having to put humans in dangerous positions. We need to balance our safety concerns about UAS with the safety gains we can realize from those operations.

Achieving that balanced approach to UAS regulation means recognizing the need for prudent first steps to get a number of these systems into the airspace. In addition to the immediate benefits, we can obtain useful operational data that will help us enhance UAS safety and allow this industry to develop and grow. Dragging our feet on developing a rational regulatory regime that provides clarity for the public, hobbyists and more sophisticated UAS developers and users will stifle innovation, delay the safety improvements that come with operational experience and postpone the benefits this technology promises. We will also see an increase in flights by those who fly UAS illegally, ignoring the FAA’s restrictions and potentially creating unsafe conditions.

In developing new regulations, the entire UAS community — government and industry alike — must also take on the challenge of informing and educating the public about how real safety risks are being addressed and mitigated. A recent Washington Post report, for instance, erroneously used examples of selective and outdated military UAS accidents in hazardous flying conditions to paint a dire picture of what problems might be engendered by UAS activities in the domestic airspace. That kind of sensational journalism doesn’t promote the clear-eyed and rational discussion we should have on regulating UAS.

Currently, we have an unstable regulatory environment, with only a handful of licensed operators, plus those who are exempt because they are in the hobbyist category. Without clear guidance, this is a recipe for trouble until the FAA publishes its small UAS proposed rule and moves on to other UAS categories. And while we appreciate the technical expertise that is going into the development of new regulations, we believe the Obama administration needs to designate an official who will take a more global policy approach to safety but one expeditiously deriving the potential benefits of widespread UAS applications.

On the positive side, the FAA’s Small Unmanned Aircraft System Aviation Rulemaking Committee has proposed a smart step-by-step approach to full UAS integration. The FAA’s six designated test sites will help us obtain valuable data to enhance the safety of UAS technical systems and to pinpoint potential safety issues. And the recent action by the FAA to entertain license exemptions for filmmakers prior to the issuance of the small UAS rule is a welcome step. AIA supported the applications for those exemptions through a joint letter with the Motion Picture Association of America to FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. Furthering progress requires us to keep taking these kinds of steps.

We should not forget that there’s a global competition ongoing to develop UAS applications. A decade after the Wright brothers flew, the United States found that it was lagging far behind European aviation capabilities and had to make a concerted effort to catch up. For the sake of the U.S. economy and society, that historic mistake should not be repeated by needlessly slowing the safety regulatory process for UAS.

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Fall Board of Governors Meeting

September 15, 2014

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Spring Board of Governors Meeting

September 15, 2014

To: May 21, 2015

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Monika Nielsen

September 12, 2014
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Student Rocketeers Wanted for World’s Largest Rocket Competition

September 08, 2014

Although the end of summer indicates the beginning of classes for students across the country, it also signals the kickoff of the world's largest annual student rocketry contest. Registration for the Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) is now open for teams of 7-12th grade students through December 12.

TARC is the U.S. aerospace and defense industry’s flagship program designed to encourage students to pursue study and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Structured to emulate the aerospace industry's design, fabrication and testing process, TARC requires teams to build and fly a model rocket that meets challenging design requirements and precise targets for altitude and flight duration.

Each year, TARC's rules and scoring parameters change to challenge the students' ingenuity and encourage a fresh approach to rocket design. This year's rules require teams to build and launch a rocket carrying a raw egg to 800 feet and return it to Earth uncracked within a flight duration of 46 to 48 seconds. A new requirement this year calls for the rocket to separate during flight, safely returning the motor and the egg to the ground detached from one another in separate segments of the rocket.

The 100 top-scoring teams from across the country will be invited to compete in the National Finals in Washington D.C. next spring. The winners will then represent America in the International Rocketry Challenge, competing against student teams from the United Kingdom and France at the Paris Air Show next June.

The Aerospace Industries Association and the National Association of Rocketry (NAR) sponsor the annual competition in partnership with NASA, the Department of Defense, the American Association of Physics Teachers and a number of AIA member companies. For additional information on TARC and complete competition results, please visit www.rocketcontest.org.

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AIA Wins Award for Best Overall Website

September 08, 2014

AIA's gold trophy for best overall association website design presented by the Hermes Creative Awards. 

AIA was recently honored by the Hermes Creative Awards for best overall association website design and awarded gold for its efforts.

This project was led by AIA’s manager of communications, Adam Kostecki, who worked with Matrix Group International to successfully complete this project by developing a visually stunning website that focuses on the central issues to AIA and the aerospace and defense industry.

“Our goal was to ensure that we highlighted the association’s core missions being pursued on behalf of our members,” recalled Adam Kostecki. “We worked hard to keep our stakeholders in mind throughout the project and I think we successfully achieved our goal.”

The website was launched in late 2013 and is helping to ensure that the association is able to continue to provide outstanding support to its members, partners and stakeholders. AIA is now capable of better advocating for the broader interests of a diverse industry with a website that provides users with a unique and easily navigable experience making it easy for visitors to quickly find what they are looking for.

About the Hermes Creative Awards

The Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of traditional materials and programs, and emerging technologies. The awards are administered and judged by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals. The international organization consists of several thousand marketing, communication, advertising, public relations, media production, web and free-lance professionals. The competition has grown to one of the largest of its kind in the world. A look at the winners shows a range in size from individual communicators to media conglomerates and Fortune 500 companies.

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AIA Wins Award for Best Overall Website

September 08, 2014

AIA was recently honored by the Hermes Creative Awards for best overall association website design and awarded gold for its efforts.

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Press Secretary

August 25, 2014

Purpose: 

Aerospace Industries Association seeks a Press Secretary to work with the communications team to provide proactive media relations support to the Office of the President and CEO as well as Association division leaders. This position will serve as a news generator for the Association as well as a point of contact for the media, social media input, and editor for web and written publications.

Media Relations:

  • Work with the Association’s media relations director to generate stories about the industry, interviews for our leadership and serve as a point of contact for reporters
  • Pitch stories to national, regional and local media outlets
  • Coordinate interviews with members of the media and Association content experts
  • Assist in all aspects of preparing AIA staff for media interviews
  • Facilitate rapid communication responses
  • Serve as point of contact for the AIA media database and maintain media lists
  • Work with internal teams to build/bulk up division-relevant media lists (ex: Export-focused, acquisition/business, etc.)
  • Scan clips in the morning and add any article authors that are not currently included in our master media list

Strategic Communications:

  • Assist the Communications team in implementing the organization’s strategic communications plan
  • Support the Association’s multi-media manager with day-to-day activity on social media and assist in creating and implementing AIAs social media strategy
  • Develop monthly media/social media tracking updates for leadership staff.
  • Report the quarterly financial results of our executive committee companies to senior staff

Writing:

  • Write, edit, fact check, and format news articles, web content, member correspondence, social media content, press releases, op-eds, marketing materials, and publications
  • Assist with writing the current Association on-line publications and blogs
  • Assist with the preparation of speeches for AIA leadership and other staff members
  • Provide editorial assistance across the association
  • Update and edit content on the website, with minimal HTML formatting
  • Work with Association staff to help ensure adherence to AP Style guidelines and overall AIA branding

Qualifications:

  • Bachelors degree in Communications; Journalism; or similar course work
  • Five years of experience in communications (ideally in journalism, a communications firm, non-profit, or on Capitol Hill)
  • Ability to exercise solid communications judgment and feel comfortable knowing when, what and with whom they should be communicating, both internally and externally
  • Track record of working well with national and regional media
  • Strong, clear, and concise writing style
  • Excellent proofreading and editing skills
  • Ability to work independently to prioritize work, set timelines, and make adjustments to work priorities as necessary
  • Understanding of, or willingness to, understand the aerospace industry and the complex relationships among the federal government, agencies, members companies and elected officials
  • Strong knowledge of social media
  • Proficient with Microsoft Suite
  • Basic experience with and knowledge of HTML
  • Basic experience with and knowledge of online media databases and media monitoring services
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AIA’s Marion Blakey Accepts the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

August 22, 2014

Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion Blakey accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge today from Capt. Lee Moak of the Air Line Pilots Association and made a personal donation of $1,000 to further support the effort to end ALS.

Her challenge went out to Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson and their head of government relations Andrea Newman, along with Club for Growth’s president Chris Chocola, and the Export-Import Bank’s chairman and president Fred Hochberg - you have 24 hours.

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For more information on how you can help fight ALS, click here: http://www.alsa.org/fight-als/ice-bucket-challenge.html

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Join us for National Aerospace Week

August 18, 2014

Please join us for National Aerospace Week the third week in September!  We would like to invite your organization to join us in recognizing the enduring value of America’s aerospace and defense industry.

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2014 Global Financial Performance Study

August 18, 2014

Deloitte has just completed their annual aerospace and defense sector financial performace study looking at the top 100 A&D companies’ in 2013. The key financial indicators studied include sales revenue, operating earnings, and operating margin. The results reveal key trends in the global A&D market.

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Manager, Membership Services & Corporate Events

August 14, 2014

Purpose: 

This position reports to the Director, Corporate Events and is responsible for helping to manage the planning and execution of multiple Association events. This position is also responsible for providing superior customer service and engaging the Association’s membership and employees throughout the year in the planning and execution process.

The ideal candidate must demonstrate the ability to multi-task; be responsive to the needs of the membership, providing all the members with outstanding customer service; be exceptionally organized and have the ability to prioritize, with the flexibility to shift work and priorities, as needed. Must be a pro-active and creative thinker; a problem solver with the ability to “think on your feet.”

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following items:

Management and Finance:

Must have the ability and skill to manage multiple events simultaneously with attendees numbering from 16 to 1,600. Manage meeting/event planning for bi-annual Board of Governors & Membership Meetings, thee Supplier Management Council Meetings a year, four Executive Committee Meetings, and one international air show each year. Work with Director, Corporate Events to monitor budgets to ensure revenue and expenses are kept within established boundaries. Review financial information for accuracy, such as invoices for services and materials; the hotel invoice, subcontractor invoices, etc. Assist with management of AIA corporate calendar for use of conference rooms for meetings.

Event Management and Administration:

Manage the registration process through Cvent, including onsite registrations, to assure accurate registration data, name badges, fee collection, attendee lists, counts for specific events and meals, etc. Work with Director to create online surveys to evaluate each meeting and event; gather and disseminate the results received. Help manage the events on-site and provide superior customer service to AIA members. Provide follow up to the events such as thank you letters to speakers and sponsors, as needed. Work with Vice President, Membership & Business Development to market AIA’s meetings. Assist in management of all special activities held in conjunction with events including golf outings, spouse events, etc.

Event Logistics:

Negotiate vendor contracts, such as audio visual, transportation, entertainment, etc. Monitor hotel room reservations for all the members of the Executive Committee for Spring and Fall Board of Governors Meeting. Manage food and beverage, as outlined on BEOs, to confirm that all meals and room setups are correct. Manage and track speakers’ requirements, i.e. transportation, hotel rooms, food allergies, AV, presentations, etc. Manage all hotel reservations at Williamsburg Inn for Spring Board of Governors Meeting.

Qualifications:

  • Excellent interpersonal, research, and communications (verbal and written) skills with a demonstrated ability to manage large corporate events.
  • Willing to take the lead and work directly on all levels of event implementation from materials shipping to registration, vendor management and participant engagement
  • Must be proactive, highly organized and detail oriented
  • Bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 3 years equivalent direct work experience in conference planning or special events
  • Certification in event management desired
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel; knowledge of Cvent a plus
  • Ability to travel
  • Availability to work evenings and weekends

 

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AIA’s Second Quarter Executive Report

August 12, 2014

Featured this quarter in the Executive Report: A message from Marion Blakey about the new Second to None Coalition; Q&A with NDD United; AIA's new digital 3D standards, and the Team America Rocketry Challenge's accomplishments for women in STEM.

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William “Bill” Koss

August 12, 2014
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Council Committee

August 05, 2014
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The Export-Import Bank Toolkit

July 30, 2014

The Export-Import Bank has, for more than 80 years, stood as a bipartisan institution that has fueled economic growth in the U.S. by helping businesses export goods globally. In 2013, the Bank earned $1.1 billion dollars for American taxpayers, supported more than $37 billion of U.S. exports, and maintained 205,000 American jobs.

Even as the Bank’s benefits are clearly defined, certain elected officials still stand in the way of American growth and seek to impede the success of small businesses. It is past time that these elected officials wakeup to the need for the Bank and support its reauthorization.

That is why AIA is dedicated to supporting the businesses in our industry that utilize the Bank and to spread the word about the need to reauthorize the Bank. We do encourage you to take action to support the bank which is why we have included all of our resources below along with a link for you to write to you elected officials to urge their support.

TAKE ACTION IMMEDIATELY TO SUPPORT EXPORT-IMPORT BANK's REAUTHORIZATION

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Motion Picture and Aerospace Industries Urge FAA to Support Increased Usage of Small UAS in Films

July 29, 2014

Groups seek exemption for Astraeus Aerial to open economic opportunities for the motion picture and aviation industries

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey and Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. Chairman and CEO Senator Chris Dodd

Arlington, Va. — The Aerospace Industries Association and Motion Picture Association of America are urging the Federal Aviation Administration to support increasing the safe operation of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) in film productions.

In a letter to FAA administrator Michael Huerta, AIA President and Chief Executive Officer Marion C. Blakey and MPAA Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Senator Chris Dodd asked the agency to approve an exemption request by Astraeus Aerial to operate sUAS for movie and television productions. The exemption application details how licensed professionals can operate small, camera-equipped unmanned systems safely in U.S. airspace.  A favorable approval also would widen opportunities for other, similar operators.

As the letter states, AIA and MPAA represent industries that support more than 2.5 million American jobs and produce more than $125 billion in annual exports.  Once these and other exemptions are granted to permit sUAS operations for movie productions, both industries will benefit.

While recognizing the final FAA sUAS rules will not be issued as originally directed by Congress next month, AIA and MPAA urged the agency to remain on track to issue the sUAS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in November to allow the period of public review and comment to begin.

“This country is the birthplace of the motion picture, television and aviation industries, and the United States has a significant technological advantage in this new frontier of aviation,” the letter stated.  “This advantage, however, may be short-lived. Approving the film and television exemption requests expeditiously will help advance our nation’s global leadership in aviation by supplying the FAA with a case study and data that can expedite the successful integration of UAS into national airspace.”

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2014 Executive Report Second Quarter

July 25, 2014

The Executive Report is an AIA quarterly publication which provides news and information about our association membership, AIA initiatives and events, and other information from around the industry.

Featured this quarter in the Executive Report:

  • President's Message: Second to None Steams Ahead
  • Q & A With Emily J. Holubowich – Co-Chair, NDD United
  • AIA/NAS 3D Digital Standards Gaining Market Traction
  • Team America Rocketry Challenge: Bridging the Gap for Women in STEM Since 2002

 

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AIA Leads the Way on Acquisition Rebalancing

July 24, 2014

In response to a request from Congress seeking input on ways to improve the defense acquisition system, AIA is leading the way with a new report that provides guidance on the best ways for the government to rebalance its purchasing power by lowering costs while safeguarding our industrial base.

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Domestic Aviation Manufacturing: Challenges and Opportunities

July 23, 2014

Subcommittee on Aviation, House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

WRITTEN REMARKS BY:
Marion C. Blakey, President and CEO
July 23, 2014

INTRODUCTION

The Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) appreciates the opportunity to present our views on the state of domestic aircraft manufacturing in the United States and the challenges we face in maintaining that leadership position. AIA and our members are very proud of the fact that, today, there is no sector of our economy contributing more to U.S. net exports than commercial aviation manufacturing. And in our own country, sales in all sectors continue to climb even as we experience the highest safety record in the history of commercial aviation. 

I am Marion Blakey, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIA, the nation’s largest trade association representing United States aerospace and defense manufacturers. Our 350 member companies represent an industry directly employing one million workers, and supporting another 2.5 million jobs either indirectly or as suppliers. Today I will discuss some of the challenges our industry faces in maintaining our manufacturing advantage in the face of stiff competition. But first, I'd like to highlight the prominent and increasing role of technological investment and innovation in aircraft manufacturing.

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

U. S. aircraft manufacturers continue to hold strong positions in the world market, in part because of the technological advances that are driving those markets. The Boeing Company estimates that, over the next twenty years, the world's fleet of aircraft will double, and 80 percent of those aircraft will involve non-U.S. purchasers. Right now, our industry exports $72 billion more than we import, a figure that leads all U. S. industries and one that continues to grow with worldwide demand.

U. S. exports of civil aircraft, engines, avionics, and related components are a sign of our strong industrial reputation throughout the world. It is a solid, well-earned reputation for safety, quality, and attention to detail. But it is also a testament to an industry that invests billions of dollars in research and development to remain competitive through the use of increasingly sophisticated technologies. Let me give you a few examples:

Innovative Materials.--To address customer concerns over historically high fuel prices, manufacturers continue to reduce aircraft weight through the use of advanced, lighter weight materials in wing structures, fan blades, fuselage sections, and other parts of the aircraft. For example, by weight about 50 percent of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner's airframe structure is comprised of composites. This compares to about 5 percent from designs of the 1960's. Manufacturers are using carbon and glass fiber composites, ceramic and metal matrix composites, titanium, and new alloys such as aluminum-lithium in a continuing search for
higher-strength, lighter weight materials.

Nanotechnology.—Increasingly, our industry is using a variety of nanotechnologies to improve aircraft durability and performance. These run the gamut from "nano coatings" on windows to reduce aerodynamic drag, advanced turbine blade coatings to provide greater durability, and new, "nano-filler" materials to reduce weight.

Engine Manufacturing.--Our engine manufacturers are breaking new ground to reduce engine weight and emissions while improving fuel efficiency. (And this comes from an industry that has already increased fuel efficiency by 20 percent over the past decade). For example, a number of our manufacturers are using "additive manufacturing", commonly referred to as "3D printing", to make engine parts. They are evaluating and developing different biofuels collaboratively through the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI). And they contribute, dollar-for-dollar, to the FAA's Continuous Low Energy, Emissions and Noise (CLEEN) program. The first phase of CLEEN developed certifiable aircraft technologies that will significantly reduce noise, emissions and fuel burn. To its credit, the FAA program requires industry to demonstrate a path to the commercial market, ensuring the technology benefits will be realized. These are developed to high technology readiness levels (TRL 6-7) to transition them quickly to aviation users. 

Our industry today is an engine of national economic growth and innovation. However, aviation is a vibrant, global market that not only emboldens our existing competitors, but is certain to produce new competitors in the coming decades. To retain and strengthen our current leadership, the federal government must do its part. It must provide a streamlined regulatory environment, equitable financial support, international leadership, and government infrastructure for our industry to do what it does best -- innovate and compete. Let me discuss some of these challenges.

FAA's AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCESS

Product certification delays continue to be a main impediment to our manufacturers' global competitiveness. Recognizing this problem, the FAA launched nine years ago with industry support the Organization Designation Authorization (ODA). ODA creates an extension of the FAA itself within a company by defining an organization, its responsibilities and the associated processes it will follow to ensure compliance with regulations. In short, rather than focus on giving authority to individual experts, the ODA process approves designated organizations and their processes. The FAA then audits the organization’s execution and
compliance. Importantly, ODA does not reduce or diminish the FAA’s safety oversight responsibilities in any way. Rather, it makes more efficient the mechanisms by which the same level of assurance and protection of the flying public is achieved. This systems approach to oversight leverages FAA resources and critical technical knowledge within the manufacturers’ organizations, ensuring a continual two-way exchange of information between the regulator and manufacturer.

Unfortunately we have yet to achieve full benefits of the ODA, as the FAA’s culture at the working level has been slow to embrace this systems approach to certification. We urge the FAA to allow maximum use of delegation, not only to take full advantage of industry expertise, but to increase the collaboration and partnership that leads to improved aviation safety. We hope the Committee will recognize that this approach, when fully implemented, will enhance aviation safety, ensure full technical input into the certification process and allow FAA to focus its limited resources on critical areas of aviation safety.

The industry appreciates the strong support provided by this Committee for the reform of FAA's Aircraft Certification Service. Sections 312 and 313 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 helped jump-start a cultural change in FAA's regulatory system. We believe that FAA leadership is taking this initiative seriously and in line with Congressional intent. But cultural change is difficult. It has to permeate down to the lowest levels of the organization, take root there, and grow back up. The Section 312 Aviation Rulemaking Committee commissioned by Congress has recommended, and the FAA has accepted, a comprehensive change management plan that, if properly implemented, would transition its workforce to focus on a risk-based, systems safety approach for certification and oversight. Of critical importance over the coming year is the development of specific measures of effectiveness, the use of these measures to track progress toward a systems safety approach, and the extent to which FAA modifies its personnel expectations and training to
communicate these changes to the field.

Too many times, as technology changes, we are seeing the FAA's rules and rulemaking procedures unable to keep pace. Let me offer you one example. Several decades ago the FAA specified a requirement for engine manufacturers to put new engine designs through a 150-hour endurance test. These requirements were based on the piston engine technology that was predominant at that time -- in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the test requirements have not been updated to reflect modern technology, where engines are controlled by full authority digital engine control (FADEC) systems, and where huge strides have been made over the decades in engine reliability, safety and emissions. Our manufacturers make artificial, unnecessary changes to the engine's production configuration simply to run this test. And when the test is over, they spend time and resources to put the engine back into its normal state. The FAA has been working to update the fifty year old regulations for some time now, and they hope to have some improvements in place within the next year or two. But it is a
good example of how technology is outpacing FAA's ability to keep up in this field.

If up to 80% of future aircraft purchases are for markets outside the United States, that means our manufacturers will see an increasingly diverse mix of customers, each coming with unique requirements and design preferences. This will lead to workload growth at the FAA. And this growth will be in technological complexity as well as size, for the role of new materials, nanotechnologies, and automation continues to grow. The average age of FAA's safety inspector workforce (flight standards and certification) is 52 and almost 30 percent are currently eligible to retire. Although the agency plans a more aggressive recruitment of younger personnel into safety critical positions, for the past few years they have fallen short of their goal. The agency needs to ensure not only that its retiring workforce is replaced in an effective manner, but that all of its inspectors receive adequate in-service training to remain current on the products and technologies they are regulating. Although we believe the agency has a dedicated workforce today, we do not believe FAA can accommodate the growth and complexity in certification workload without effectively implementing the cultural change called for in the Section 312 ARC. We need this Committee's watchful eye to help to make that happen.

AIA also believes the agency needs to make stronger progress on implementing the findings of the Section 313 ARC, to ensure the consistency of regulatory interpretations and findings among FAA's field offices.

FAA AND INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION AUTHORITIES

Another issue that concerns us is the amount of duplicative work that our manufacturers endure when seeking approval of their products by foreign authorities. Today the United States is party to over 30 bilateral agreements that govern the procedures for approval of aviation products between FAA and other authorities including the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). These agreements take years to develop and are intended to leverage the capabilities of the exporting authority (the certifying authority), to eliminate unnecessary and duplicative work by the importing authority (the validating authority). The objective, of course, is to reduce duplication of effort - a critical element for reducing cost. As the ARC stated in its final report, "The efficiency of validation procedures and acceptance of FAA type certificated aerospace products is essential to the competitiveness of U. S. manufacturers".

Unfortunately, our manufacturers are increasingly going through what amounts to multiple certification processes, because overseas validating authorities are reducing their acceptance of FAA's work. As the ARC concluded, "there is an apparent trend of reduced global acceptance of U. S. FAA type certificated products . . . more and more countries are no longer accepting or recognizing U. S. FAA type certificated products as acceptable for import and are requiring a separate certification or validation by their own authorities". The cost of such efforts, including fees and charges for the extra work, can exceed several million dollars, and is a significant and unnecessary burden on U. S. manufacturers. FAA's global leadership and its collaboration with international partners are key elements of changing this unacceptable trend. Industry is eager to work with the FAA to improve the acceptance of FAA approved products globally and provide a seamless transfer across geographical boundaries.

EXPORT CREDIT FAIRNESS

For U. S. manufacturing to thrive, we must have a healthy export policy, because most of the world's consumers are beyond our borders. This is a simple fact that other nations recognize as well. That is why there are more than 60 export credit agencies established by governments around the globe. Our Export-Import ("Ex-Im") Bank is one of them. It is vital for the aerospace industry's global competitiveness, and its authorization to conduct business expires in less than ten weeks. The bank supports a wide variety of U. S. exports, including power turbines, locomotives, agricultural equipment, and satellites. But it should come as no surprise that our nation's largest export sector -- commercial aircraft -- also receives significant support from Ex-Im. Some of the Bank's opponents believe that wide body aircraft should not benefit from Ex-Im support -- even though thousands of U. S. workers owe their jobs to that very support, both directly and indirectly as suppliers. Such exclusions are not made by the three export import banks of Europe that enable the sale of European
wide-body aircraft to the world’s airlines. Nor should our own government unilaterally impose such restrictions on the financing of U.S. manufactured airplanes. Equally important, the employees of our general aviation manufacturers have jobs because of Ex-Im. Statistics from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association indicate that more than 50 percent of the revenue of U. S. general aviation manufacturers in 2013 was derived from exports. A decade earlier, that figure was only 20 percent. Why should we unilaterally disarm and watch those jobs go overseas to workers in other nations?

Earlier this year, I participated at an Ex-Im event at the Gulfstream Aerospace plant in Savannah, Georgia. Ex-Im has now provided over $1 billion in support to our general aviation manufacturers, including Gulfstream. And when you look those workers squarely in the eye, you know this is important, not only for their families, but for our nation. If Congress fails to reauthorize the continued operations of the Export-Import Bank before
September 30, 2014, there will be fewer workers like those at the Gulfstream plant, and more at the plants of our foreign competitors. It is as simple as that.

THE ROLE OF NEXTGEN AND DOMESTIC AIRSPACE

Our industry also benefits from increased domestic air travel in the United States, the world's largest market. And that market continues to grow. Last year, there were 826 million passengers in U. S. airspace. This is the second highest level in history, and the highest since the economic recession of 2007. The average load factor on our nation's airlines last year was more than 83 percent, the highest on record.

However, air travel within the United States is concentrated among a relatively small number of airports and within a small number of peak periods, presenting serious capacity challenges for our nation's air traffic control system. According to the FAA, about 70 percent of all commercial passengers are concentrated at the nation's top 30 airports. Furthermore, FAA projects that the number of U. S. airline passengers will increase over the next few years from 826 million today to over 1.3 billion. This will require, among other things, more civil aircraft.

U. S. manufacturers look forward to providing these additional aircraft and the engines, avionics and components that go into them. But if FAA's air traffic control infrastructure is not improved, those passengers will not materialize, and our economy will be held back. That is the purpose of NextGen, to provide the capacity needed to handle this future growth while maintaining or improving upon today’s level of safety.

AIA appreciates the near-term financial relief for fiscal years 2014 and 2015 that Congress provided in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. However, when sequestration returns in fiscal year 2016, we urge Congress to make sure the NextGen program is adequately funded. Deputy FAA Administrator Michael Whitaker testified recently before the Senate that NextGen needs approximately $1 billion a year. Current funding is closer to $850 million, and there are concerns it could be cut even further. In fact, the FAA's NextGen budget request for the coming year is $200 million below the request of only two years ago. If the FAA is constantly hamstrung by budget cuts, the system capacity improvements from NextGen will suffer the most. Future travelers paying user fees into the Airport and Airway Trust Fund have a right to expect a modern, satellite-based system that gets them to their destination safely and usually on time. If the projected level of air travel is to materialize, we will need continued investment in a twenty-first century air traffic control infrastructure.

UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) represent the newest frontier in the world of aviation, and they promise to both disrupt and transform many of our current ways of doing business. They will create new avenues for our economy by performing jobs that are too "dull, dirty or dangerous" to be performed today. They will change for the better the way we respond to natural disasters, search for missing persons, and fight wildfires. And we appreciate the leadership of Congress in getting us to where we are today in the process of integrating unmanned aircraft into our airspace.

FAA has taken the initial steps on UAS integration, but much more needs to be done. For example, the agency needs to ensure that the development of equipment and operator standards remains on schedule and that the proposed rule for small UAS does not fall farther behind. They need to ensure that ATC automation platforms are modified with appropriate software so the system is ready when the regulations are finalized. And they need to ensure the program has adequate budgetary resources to meet Congressional intent. We see a lot of dots, but more needs to be done to connect them into a coherent picture.

GLOBALLY COMPETITIVE TAX POLICY

The Research and Experimentation Tax Credit (commonly called “R&D Tax Credit”) is an important incentive for national business investment in R&D. This is important for many sectors of our economy, but it is especially important for high-tech companies in the aerospace sector. The innovations I previously described, including activities that improve aviation safety, are strongly fostered and supported by our R&D Tax Credit. Unfortunately, the credit was allowed to expire at the end of last year, a political football caught up in the broader discussion of comprehensive tax reform.

U. S. commercial aerospace manufacturers are at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis foreign competitors whose home countries almost universally have more favorable and more predictable R&D tax credits. A permanent R&D credit was proposed by the Administration and has already passed the House. We hope you will urge your Senate colleagues to act favorably on these proposals either separately or as part of comprehensive tax reform legislation. At a minimum, legislation is urgently needed to restart the R&D tax credit and apply its provisions retroactively to the beginning of calendar year 2014.

MAINTAINING A SKILLED AEROSPACE WORKFORCE

With a global market that is growing rapidly, and with the pace of technological innovation increasing, we must maintain an adequate supply of aerospace workers with degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines and job-specific manufacturing skills.

Unfortunately, today the United States is simply not producing enough workers with the right technical skills. The U. S. graduates around 300,000 students a year with bachelors or associate degrees in STEM fields. The February 2012 report of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) said this figure falls short of our economic need by one-third. Today, less than 40% of students who start college intending to earn a STEM degree actually complete the degree requirements. And we should not keep our sole focus on four year degrees, for community colleges and career technical education play equally important roles. In fact, one-third of our current STEM employees began their education in community colleges.

Our STEM workforce challenge is exacerbated by the fact that the aerospace industry is, in a word, graying. In 2007, we found that almost 60 percent of the U.S. aerospace workforce was age 45 or older. Today, 9.6 percent of our industry is eligible to retire, and projections are that by 2017 -- just three years from now -- 18.5% of the entire industry will be eligible to retire. At our largest corporations (those employing 100,000 or more), the percentage of the retirement eligible workforce is already 18.6 percent. We are experiencing a shortage of STEM workers today, but the problem will be even greater when the bow wave of actual retirement hits us in the next couple of years. How will we keep these jobs in the U. S. if we cannot find and train enough workers? That is a real concern of many in our industry looking to the future.

OPEN SKIES

I would also like to take a moment to comment on the continuing importance of international Open Skies agreements. For more than 20 years, Open Skies agreements have transformed today’s commercial aviation sector. The broad base of support in the U.S.—in Government and among its many stakeholders—has made it possible for the United States to negotiate agreements with over 110 countries. Today, more than 240 different airlines operate around the globe, carrying more than 3.1 billion passengers last year. Open Skies have created healthy competition in the marketplace, bringing new entrants to the fold, lower fares for consumers, and economic prosperity to airports and their communities around the country. Moreover, these new markets have created a need for new aircraft technologies like Boeing’s 787 and 777X which enable
passengers to travel longer distances in greater comfort. Open Skies agreements have created opportunities for the development and deployment of new technologies and new markets for U.S.-manufactured airplanes and services.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, we believe that U. S. aviation manufacturers are in a strong competitive position today, but there are risks to our maintaining this position over the next decade. It is important for the Federal Government to provide the underlying policies that allow us to compete internationally and to grow our domestic air travel here at home. This includes export financing, workforce, and tax policies that are competitive with the policies of other nations, and that allow us to maintain jobs here in the United States. It includes a new infrastructure in air traffic control technology that grows and ensures the safety of our domestic airspace. It includes partnerships in technology programs like CLEEN, and in promoting the next frontier of aviation -- unmanned aircraft.

Thank you for the opportunity to appear today, and I look forward to your questions.

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Raytheon-sponsored Team Wins Second at International Contest

July 22, 2014

Creekview High School students took home silver in the seventh annual International Rocketry Challenge at the Farnborough International Air Show (Photo Credit: Raytheon).

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Open Letter to Congress on the Need for Ex-Im Bank

July 21, 2014

AIA's President and CEO, Marion C. Blakey, in a recent letter to both chambers of Congress, made a strong case for the reautorization of the Export-Import Bank of the U.S.

We know that not reautorizing hte bank would be equivilent economic unilateral disarmament agains nearly 60 other foreign credit agencies. We hope you will join with us to support the Ex-Im Bank to sustain the American economy and U.S. jobs. 

Sign the Petition

 

Download:

Open Letter to Congress on the Need for Ex-Im Bank Insert title here

U.S. team captures Silver in 2014 International Rocketry Challenge

July 18, 2014

Raytheon-sponsored team from Canton, Ga., wins second place in student rocketry challenge at the Farnborough International Air Show

LONDON – Five students from Creekview High School of Canton, Ga.,took home silver medals in the seventh annual International Rocketry Challenge at the Farnborough International Air Show.The U.S. team, sponsored by Raytheon (NYSE: RTN), won second place, while the French team captured first and the U.K. team took third.

Competing teams designed, built and launched rockets with a goal of reaching an altitude of exactly 825 feet during a 48- to 50-second flight window. The payload, two raw hen eggs, had to return to the ground undamaged using two identical parachutes. Scores are determined by how close teams come to the required height and time; cracked eggs disqualify the flight.

The U.S. team in red flanked by the teams from France, Japan and Great Britain.

The five-member team representing the United States consists of Amanda Semler, 18; Andrew White, 16; Nick Dimos, 16; Austin Bralick, 16; and Bailey Robertson, 15. The team posted the top flight score of 9.88 and was just nine feet shy of the target altitude. The team from France posted the next highest flight score of 448.32 followed by the UK team with a flight score of 715.2.

The students also gave a presentation on their rocket design to a panel of international judges at Raytheon’s air show headquarters. The judges’ score counted for 40 percent of their total score.

“I had a great time being out here with all of the other people from different countries and meeting other people with similar interests,” said Team Captain Amanda Semler.“I hope it will inspire other women to get into the industry and reach their dreams.”

The International Rocketry Challenge is the culmination of three separate competitions held annually around the globe: the Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association of America (AIA); the United Kingdom Aerospace Youth Rocketry Challenge (UKAYRoC) sponsored by ADS, the UK Aerospace, Defense, Security and Space association; and the French Rocketry Challenge sponsored by Groupement des Industries FrancaisesAeronautiques et Spatiales, the French aerospace industries association. Each contest brings together teams of middle and high school students to design, build and launch model rockets with the goal of inspiring young minds to become engaged in science, technology, engineering and math.

“The knowledge, discipline and commitment displayed by students to make it to this level of competition is extraordinary,” said Thomas A. Kennedy, CEO of Raytheon. “By celebrating student achievement on a global stage, Raytheon hopes to inspire more students to challenge themselves to share their knowledge and natural curiosity as they collaborate to uncover winning solutions.”

This is the ninth year that Raytheon has supported the U.S. team's trip to the international air show. The program is part of the company’s broad-based MathMovesU® initiative to encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“The ingenuity and determination displayed today by the U.S. team is a powerful indicator that young Americans remain committed to excellence in STEM-related fields,” said AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey. “I am confident that students like these will continue to bolster America’s global leadership in aerospace for generations to come.”

About MathMovesU
Raytheon's MathMovesU® program is an initiative committed to increasing middle and elementary school students' interest in math and science education by engaging them in hands-on, interactive activities. The innovative programs of MathMovesU include the traveling interactive experience MathAlive!®; Raytheon's Sum of all Thrills™ experience at INNOVENTIONS at Epcot®, which showcases math in action as students design and experience their own thrill ride using math fundamentals; the In the Numbers game, a partnership with the New England Patriots on display at The Hall at Patriot Place presented by Raytheon; the company's ongoing sponsorship of the MATHCOUNTS® National Competition; and the MathMovesU scholarship and grant program. Follow MathMovesU and other Raytheon community outreach programs on Facebook and on Twitter @MathMovesU.

About Raytheon
Raytheon Company, with 2013 sales of $24 billion and 63,000 employees worldwide, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, security and civil markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 92 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as cyber security and a broad range of mission support services. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Mass. For more about Raytheon, visit us at www.raytheon.com and follow us on Twitter @Raytheon.

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Director, Space Systems

July 16, 2014

Purpose: 

This Director is responsible for providing liaison to and coordinating the development of consensus positions among AIA and Member company entities addressing space and related issues and also monitoring and addressing issues pertaining to space, spacecraft and related products.

Nature and Scope of Work: 

This position reports to the Vice President, Space Systems.

Responsibilities include monitoring issues, regulations and developments as they relate to and impact industry members in the area of space, and in coordinating the activities of the AIA Space Council, its committees, subcommittees, task groups and panels established to address these issues.  These bodies may take the initiative to formulate positions to be presented to federal agencies including DoD, NRO, MDA, OSTP, NASA, FAA/AST and NOAA as well as their various bureaus and commissions; or respond to government inquiries dealing with special areas of concern that require industry input.

Serves as the principal liaison to the National Security Space Committee and supports the Civil Space, and Commercial Space committees, and any working groups, panels and task forces under the jurisdiction of these committees.  Works closely with committee chairpersons to plan and execute committee business, and researches various media to identify and clarify issues. Drafts AIA's positions on the various issues and topics under consideration by the council and its committees. 

Confers with officials within the Administration, Congress, and agencies to gain attention and favorable consideration of AIA's viewpoint on subjects of current interest. Assists in making arrangements for joint government-industry working groups and project teams within assigned area of responsibility in order to facilitate consensus building on major issues affecting the industry.  Drafts testimony and attends congressional hearings impacting committee issues. Collaborates closely with the Director of Legislative Affairs to plan and carry out legislative strategy.

Serves as a subject matter expert and responds to inquiries from member companies and government officials seeking information and background data on incumbent's areas of knowledge with a strong focus on customer service.  These inquiries can range from general questions to highly specific requests that may take days to assemble the required data and background information.  Works with other divisions within AIA such as Communications to periodically provide expertise on space subjects that inform organization-wide products.

Oversees all arrangements for council operations. This includes developing background information and materials, as well as planning and carrying out Council and committee meetings.  Runs day to day operations for the department at the tactical level, and supports the Vice President for all strategic level requirements.

Qualifications:

 

  • Excellent interpersonal, research, and communications (verbal and written) skills with a demonstrated ability to to build consensus and unity in a group with divergent perspectives and interests
  • Bachelor’s degree in a technical discipline, political science, government affairs, international affairs or related field required
  • Graduate/advanced degree (or degree in progress) in political science, government affairs, international affairs or related field strongly preferred
  • 5+ years work experience in a related area (e.g. aerospace industry, NASA, NOAA, DoD or trade association); national security related credentials strongly preferred
  • Military service or support experience valued
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What defense acquisition reform looks like

July 16, 2014

Defense acquisition reform won’t happen overnight; it will require several months if not a year or more of down in the weeds work.

That’s the message we sent to Congress, in response to requests from the House and Senate Armed Services committees for ideas on how to improve the process. That analogy – in the weeds — is an apt one, considering the overgrowth of weedy rules and regulations that inhibits the ability of our procurement system to flourish. 


But the situation is far from hopeless. AIA offered three principles for acquisition rebalancing: 1) optimize the use of scarce government resources; 2) allow industry the ability to execute more quickly and more efficiently; and 3) provide greater opportunities for industry to deliver the technologies, products and services our nation demands.

So what does that mean? To answer that question, we dug a little deeper, pointing to specific areas of reform. The first involves Department of Defense audits. The existing audit machine has added layers of complexity, adding time to complete audits, delaying contracts, impacting delivery schedules and key milestones as well as contract closeouts. This especially is onerous on smaller firms who need predictable revenue forecasts to support their operations and financial stability. We recommended that DOD make a greater effort to clear the audit backlog, reduce excessive documentation requirements, eliminate redundant audit and surveillance activity and focus auditors’ efforts on programs that are truly at risk.

Our second recommendation addressed the treatment of commercial items. Despite congressional direction and DOD policy expressing openness to using less expensive off-the-shelf commercial items that can leverage private investments in new products, the reality is the actual implementation of this policy is sorely lacking. The increased use by procurement officers of DOD unique or specific requirements stresses the supply chain and dissuades commercial suppliers from participating in the procurement system. Also, uneven interpretations of the definition of commercial items convert an otherwise straightforward commercial purchase as envisioned, into a lengthy DOD unique one. We maintain DOD should not impose rules, regulations and practices making it more difficult for the services to buy commercial items.

Our third recommendation concerns the need for the DOD to take a more active role in protecting company intellectual property rights. Appropriate IP protection will enable increased competition and innovation, provide more opportunity to leverage private investment, and result in a more robust and healthy contractor community and supply change.
Finally, we asserted that federal regulators should make a greater effort to engage experts, stakeholders and interest groups in the formulation of new acquisition rules prior to the rules being written. Explore potential rules with a spirit of collaboration, and government may avoid the messy fights that often occur during a shortened public comment period. An open dialogue with stakeholders will ensure the costs and benefits of potential rules are understood, possible alternative solutions for streamlining a rules implementation are examined, and that industry is able to comply.

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Summer SMC Meeting - Hosted by 3M

July 10, 2014

Where will BAE Systems, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney, Raytheon and other industry leaders be this August 4-6?

That's right, these companies and more will be at the aerospace and defense supply chain event of the year - the Aerospace Industries Association’s summer Supplier Management Council meeting, August 4-6, 2014, at the St. Paul Hotel in St. Paul, Minnesota, hosted by 3M.

As we all know, these are critical times for our industry. Now more than ever, AIA members must work together to preserve and protect the aerospace and defense industry and find opportunities for growth. We look forward to having you with us at the Supplier Management Council as we work together on our most challenging issues.

Click here to register

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MEETING

BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MEETINGS WITH 3M

3M will be scheduling one-on-one business meetings between AIA members and 3M's Business Unit and Sourcing Leaders from across 3M's Aerospace, Defense and Industrial business areas.  3M Representatives will have special expertise in the following:

  • Metalworking and fabrication
  • Bonding and adhesives
  • Paint prep and finishing
  • Erosion protection and prevention
  • Worker safety
  • Various technologies to enable lighter, safer, quieter and faster aircraft
  • And much more

TECHNOLOGY FAIR & EXPO

  • Technology Fair and Product Expo is sponsored by 3M Defense and will feature cutting edge technologies, applications and products for the Aerospace and Defense industries.
  • Technical and Business leaders from key 3M divisions will be on hand to show AIA members how 3M technology can be incorporated into their processes to drive higher productivity, lower costs, improve worker safety and solve their toughest design in problems.

GUEST SPEAKERS & EVENTS

  • Elliott Branch, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Acquisition and Procurement (confirmed)
  • Brett Lambert, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy and Senior Fellow, NDIA (invited)
  • Congresswoman, Betty McCollum (D-MN), member of the House Appropriations Defense Subcommittee (confirmed)
  • Charity Golf Outing & Reception to Benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, hosted by 3M Monday, August 4th
  • St. Croix River Boat Reception & Dinner Cruise, hosted by 3M on Wednesday, August 6th

Please Note: The last day to receive a refund of the registration fee is Monday, July 7th.

We look forward to seeing you in St. Paul!

Click here to register

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Acquisition Rebalancing: Recommendations for Smart, Efficient & Effective Defense Procurement

July 10, 2014

The Department of Defense (DOD) must change how it acquires weapon systems and services. There is growing recognition from DOD leadership, Congress and the defense industry that it is time to revise the overly complex and burdensome system that drives unnecessary cost into programs and will soon make them unaffordable as defense budgets decline.

Making the acquisition system more economic and more responsive has been an elusive target. The challenges of time-to-delivery and product cost persist despite all attempts to reform the acquisition system over the last 40 plus years.

It’s time to stop tweaking the edges and bring the acquisition system into balance, starting with these core principles:

  • Have trust and confidence in the U.S. military and the aerospace and defense industry’s ability to deliver together outstanding technologies that keep our nation safe.
  • Balance oversight so that all parties are treated fairly and allow oversight functions to consume only the resources needed to mitigate risks of poor performance and malfeasance.
  • Employ our nation’s scarce resources to get the most value for our military from every dollar our nation invests.
  • Protect the nation’s economic and national security by developing and implementing cohesive defense industrialbase strategies.

These principles inform the recommendations presented in this paper, written to address the critical questions asked by the House and Senate Armed Services Committees. How can acquisition be more cost effective? Can delivery be expedited? Can recruitment, retention, and training of acquisition professionals be improved? How can program managers be empowered to make sound decisions, and how can technical expertise be fostered? Oversight and management ideas were also sought, as were recommendations to improve cost and delivery over the life cycle of major weapons systems. This paper is organized to address these questions and requests.

VIEW INTERACTIVE REPORT:

Acquisition Rebalancing: Recommendations for Smart, Efficient & Effective Defense Procurement

Download:

Acquisition Rebalancing: Recommendations for Smart, Efficient & Effective Defense Procurement Insert title here

May/June eUpdate 2014

July 09, 2014

 
AIA
In This Issue
Upcoming Events
Cost Principles Committee Meeting
Location: San Francisco, CA
Event Date: Jul. 16-18, 2014
 
Procurement & Finance Council Executive Committee
Location: McLean, VA
Event Date: Jul. 24, 2014
 
Procurement and Finance ExCom Meeting
Location: McLean, VA
Event Date: Jul. 24, 2014
 
Supplier Management Council
Location: St. Paul, MN
Event Date: Aug. 04-07, 2014
 
Procurement Techniques Committee
Location: Seattle, WA
Event Date: Aug. 07, 2014 
 
Government Property Systems Committee
Location: Ft. Lee, VA
Event Date: Aug. 19-20, 2014
 
DPAP/OFPP/Procurement & Finance Executive Committee
Location: TBD
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2014
 
CODSIA OFPP Meeting and GSA Meetings
Location: Washington, D.C.
Event Date: Sep. 03, 2014
 
Cost Principle Committee
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Event Date: Sep. 17-19, 2014
 
AIA Executive Committee
Location: Arlington, VA
Event Date: Sep. 18, 2014n
  
Cost Principle Committee
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Event Date: Sep. 17-19, 2014
 
Procurement & Finance Council Executive Committee
Location: Falls Church, VA
Event Date: Sep. 18, 2014
 
AIA/NDIA Industrial Security Committee Fall Meeting
Location: Orlando, FL
Event Date: Sep. 21-23, 2014
 
National Aerospace Standards Committee
Location: Portland, OR
Event Date: Sep. 30-Oct. 2, 2014
 
Viewpoint
 
 
Marion C. Blakey
President and CEO
 
We recognize that many subjects related to our industry can be very complex. Accordingly, for reporters covering aerospace and defense, it often pays to take the time to provide them with detailed and useful information about their focus of interest. At AIA, we are committed to working closely with journalists to give them the background they need to get their stories right. Our communications department fields dozens of calls every day from reporters and either responds directly to information requests, sets up interviews with myself and/or our policy experts, or if appropriate, have them reach out to member companies.
Top News
 
 AIA’s Spring Board of Governors and Membership Meeting in Williamsburg, Virginia attracted executives from 88 of the association’s full member companies. The extensive program featured an excellent lineup of senior administration and industry officials and seasoned commentators and experts.
 
 This February, AIA and its member companies participated in the 2014 Singapore Air Show. This year's event -the largest air show in Asia- was held at the Changhi Exhibition Centre. The United States' aircraft corral supported by AIA displayed a P-8 Poseidon, an MV-22B Osprey, a C-17 Globemaster, a KC-130J Hercules, and a KC-135R Stratotanker. The C-17, MV-22B, and an F-16C participated in the flying displays.
Still less than a year old, AIA's Workforce Policy Council has proved to be an aggressive advocate for educating other association members on workforce and STEM-related issues. In effort to highlight the importance of growing AIA's workforce efforts, one of the sessions at the Spring Supplier Management Council meeting held in Dallas this March focused on STEM education and workforce development.
AIA hosted in March a panel discussion and open forum with industry and government representatives on AIA’s new space report, Easing the Burden—Reducing the Cost of National Security Space Capabilities.
To help counter the media-fed misperception that NASA’s human spaceflight program ended with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and to help provide a clear understanding of recent program progress, AIA recently published The New American Space Age: A Progress Report on Human Spaceflight.
After six months of rocketry design, simulated flights and test launches, hundreds of middle and high school students from across the country traveled to the nation’s capital in May for the championship round of the Team America Rocketry Challenge.
AIA Spotlight: Director for International Affairs, Dak Hardwick
 
Congratulations to AIA's Dak Hardwick on his recent appointment to the Virginia Aviation Board by Governor McAuliffe! Dak, along with other board appointees, will join the Governor's administration with the focus of growing Virginia's economy and creating more jobs across the Commonwealth.

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TARC Students Rocketing to New Heights Through STEM Education

July 09, 2014

Congressman Randy Weber (R-Texas 14th District) at 'Rockets on the Hill' meeting with teams from Clear Falls High School and Jefferson County 4H Club

After six months of rocketry design, simulated flights and test launches, hundreds of middle and high school students from across the country traveled to the nation’s capital in May for the championship round of the Team America Rocketry Challenge.

TARC is the world’s largest student rocket contest and the aerospace and defense industry’s flagship program designed to encourage students to pursue study and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Organized by the Aerospace Industries Association and the National Association of Rocketry (NAR), TARC provides middle and high school students the opportunity to design, build and launch model rockets in an annual competition among more than 5,000 students nationwide.

TARC activities began with the competition’s  third annual “Rockets on the Hill” congressional reception on Friday, May 10.

Greeting the students were Congressman Mike Honda of California, a member of the House STEM Education Caucus; Dr. John S. Langford, Chairman and CEO of Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation; and Leland Melvin, the NASA astronaut who led the space agency’s education mission directorate from 2010 to earlier this year. Following the reception the students visited the offices of their home state Senators and Representatives, bringing with them a strong message that STEM education pays off for America.

On Saturday, May 11, more than one hundred teams gathered at Great Meadow in The Plains, Va. to put their months of hard work to the test at the national finals. Teams had to launch a set of two raw eggs to 825 feet and return them safely to earth undamaged within a flight duration of 48 - 50 seconds using two identical parachutes. After an exciting day of competition, a large crowd gathered inside a tent to hail this year’s champions from Creekview High School in Canton, Georgia. Representing the Creekview Grizzly Bears were captain Amanda Semler, Andrew White, Bailey Robertson, Austin Bralick and Nick Dimos. The champions will share in more than $60,000 in cash and scholarship prizes and will travel to England in July courtesy of Raytheon to represent the U.S. on the world stage and compete against teams from the U.K. and France in the International Rocketry Challenge during the Farnborough Air Show.

The annual TARC activities were  made possible by generous support of more than twenty industry partners: Aerojet; ARACON, a Micro-Coax product; Aurora Flight Sciences; Elbit Systems of America; Embraer Aircraft Holding, Inc.; General Electric Company; Harris Corporation; Honeywell Aerospace; Kaman Aerospace Corporation; L-3 Communications Corporation; LMI Aerospace, Inc.; Lockheed Martin Corporation; Northrop Grumman Corporation; Parker Aerospace; Raytheon Company; Rockwell Collins; Rolls-Royce North America, Inc.; RTI International Metals, Inc.; Space Exploration Technologies Corporation; The Boeing Company; and Woodward, Inc.

In another TARC related development, we’re very pleased to announce that Miles Lifson, who joined AIA in May, will manage the 2015 competition. Lifson comes to AIA from the Office of Congresswoman Donna Edwards of Maryland. He graduated in May 2013 from Claremont McKenna College with a double major in government and physics. He also interned with the Space Studies Board of the National Academies.

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The New American Space Age: A Progress Report on Human Spaceflight

July 09, 2014

To help counter the media-fed misperception that NASA’s human spaceflight program ended with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and to help provide a clear understanding of recent program progress, AIA recently published The New American Space Age: A Progress Report on Human Spaceflight.

This publication, released at the AIA Board of Governors meeting in May, provides a highly visual tour of hardware progress and program achievements made in the suborbital commercial market, the International

Space Station Program, Commercial Crew Program, and the Deep Space Exploration Program. The report highlights numerous achievements, including the following:

  • The International Space Station is now in its 13th year of continuous habitation by American astronauts, with numerous research breakthroughs to its name - including a trial vaccine for the Salmonella pathogen.
  • Companies competing in the Commercial Crew Program are prototyping and testing flight hardware that will end our dependence on Russia for astronaut transportation.
  • Progress on the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will culminate in the first flight of an uncrewed Orion later this year on the Exploration Flight Test-1 mission.
  • State of the art tooling including a large new friction-stir welding machine is being built to support construction of the Space Launch System, which will be the largest launch vehicle ever built.

By informing Washington stakeholders of the impressive progress being made by NASA and the space industry on human spaceflight across 48 states, AIA believes the case for continued policy support and stable budgets for spaceflight programs is strengthened as Congress considers future funding for NASA programs.

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AIA Presents Space Cost Reduction Paper

July 09, 2014

AIA  hosted in March a panel discussion and open forum with industry and government representatives on AIA’s new space report, Easing the Burden—Reducing the Cost of National Security Space Capabilities. AIA Vice President of Space Systems, Frank Slazer, moderated a lively discussion featuring the following panelists:

  • Keith Robertson, National Reconnaissance Office
  • Jeff Trauberman, Vice President, Space, Intelligence and Missile Defense, Boeing
  • David Barnhart, Phoenix Program Manager, U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
  • Rick Skinner, Director, Business Development, SATCOM, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems

The speakers addressed the development of government and industry partnerships in a changing cost environment, with emphasis on new technologies that are making satellite development more cost effective. Trauberman described the upcoming Boeing 702 Satellite Product Line, an all-electric satellite to launch in 2015. The Boeing 702 uses electric thrusters, eliminating the need for chemical propulsion. Similarly, Barnhart described DARPA’s robotics experiments to develop the technology needed to reconstruct old satellites while in orbit. This program, called “Phoenix,” will conceivably lead planners to rethink the morphology and evolution of satellites.

The panelists agreed that the whole cost reduction process is not a “one size fits all” model for satellite development and evolution. When asked what will make the policies and requirements move faster, discussants focused on the need for stable funding to enable both the government and private sector to continue their cost-reduction partnerships. The panel members expressed confidence that new cost-reduction approaches can help create more affordable satellite systems without compromising quality, security, and technology advancement.

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Workforce Panel Discussion at SMC Meeting

July 09, 2014

Still less than a year old, AIA's Workforce Policy Council has proved to be an aggressive advocate for educating other association members on workforce and STEM-related issues.

In effort to highlight the importance of growing AIA's workforce efforts, one of the sessions at the Spring Supplier Management Council meeting held in Dallas this March focused on STEM education and workforce development. The panel discussion addressed a broad range of topics including: extracurricular programs for K-12 students; skills development through Career Technical Education and other specialized training programs; two- and four-year undergraduate degree programs; and targeted outreach to females, underrepresented ethnic minorities, veterans and the disabled. Moderated by Gina Burns, chair of the AIA Workforce Policy Council and Vice President, Talent & Human Resources Operations at Lockheed Martin, the panel provided a range of perspectives and encompassed a broad spectrum of STEM education and workforce development programs in which AIA member companies are involved.

The panel is just one of a number of activities that AIA’s Workforce Policy Council has sponsored to help smaller aerospace and defense companies leverage efforts underway in their communities to address their workforce challenges. All AIA member companies are eligible to participate in any of the five workforce-related working groups organized under the Workforce Policy Council.

Dr. Brian Fitzgerald, CEO of the Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF), emphasized public-private partnerships established with universities by Raytheon and Northrop Grumman to grow particular talent - such as cybersecurity specialists - through regional workforce projects coordinated by BHEF. Dr. Ralph Coppola, President of RKC International, spoke about the Real World Design Challenge, an extracurricular STEM competition to engage high school students in engineering design that he founded as an employee of AIA member company PTC. Brent Weil, Senior Vice President for Education and Workforce at the Manufacturing Institute, provided insight on how manufacturers like Boeing are addressing current technically-skilled worker shortfalls by developing customized training programs implemented by community colleges in areas of high demand. Joan Robinson-Berry, Boeing’s Vice President, Supplier Management for Shared Services Group, described that company's approach and efforts they have underway to attract and develop a diverse and inclusive talent pool. And Scott Thams, CEO, Integrity Aerospace Group, Inc., and a member of AIA’s Executive Committee, spoke to the role that smaller aerospace firms like his can have in developing productive apprentice programs.

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AIA Promotes Industry at Singapore and Farnborough Air Shows

July 09, 2014

This February, AIA and its member companies participated in the 2014 Singapore Air Show. This year's event -the largest air show in Asia- was held at the Changhi Exhibition Centre. The United States' aircraft corral supported by AIA displayed a P-8 Poseidon, an MV-22B Osprey, a C-17 Globemaster, a KC-130J Hercules, and a KC-135R Stratotanker. The C-17, MV-22B, and an F-16C participated in the flying displays.

At the show, AIA provided members the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion on export control reform, which featured: Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Defense Trade Controls Kenneth Handelman; Director of the Defense Technology Security Administration Beth McCormick; and Director of the Munitions Control Division in the Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security, Michael Vaccaro.

AIA also hosted a luncheon address by Under Secretary of Defense for AT&L Frank Kendall. Joining Under Secretary Kendall and a number of AIA member company senior executives at the luncheon were Alan Shaffer, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, Elana Broitman, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy and Keith Webster, Director of International Cooperation at AT&L.

Kendall spoke about the need for increased and better-coordinated U.S. government participation at international trade shows, as they provide a forum to engage his direct foreign counterparts and promote U.S. aerospace and defense trade. He outlined the U.S.’ strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region, the role international trade plays in maintaining the health of the domestic defense industrial base, and the importance of a "whole of government" approach to security cooperation engagement and advocacy with our closest allies.

Noting AT&L’s top priorities for 2014, Kendall emphasized the importance of supporting the U.S. war fighter in completing current missions. He also discussed the “Protect the Future” strategy that is designed to emphasize support for small businesses, continue development of a highly-skilled workforce, and increase research and development investments.

At the Farnborough International Air Show (July 14-20), AIA anticipates a similarly robust U.S. government presence. At Farnborough, AIA will support U.S. personnel and equipment participating in the show while also managing the U.S. DOD Corral. Several AIA-hosted events at the upcoming air show will foster a dialogue between the U.S. government and AIA members, as well as promote U.S. aerospace and defense trade and security cooperation with foreign customers. These activities represent the first steps AIA’s proposal for an Aerospace & Defense Trade Initiative, a concept which has been briefed to and is receiving growing interest and support from senior U.S. government officials at the Commerce Department, State Department, DoD, the FAA, and the NSC.

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Williamsburg – 2014 Spring Board of Governors Meeting

July 09, 2014

AIA’s Spring Board of Governors and Membership Meeting in Williamsburg, Virginia attracted executives from 88 of the association’s full member companies. The extensive program featured an excellent lineup of senior administration and industry officials and seasoned commentators and experts, including:    Anthony Foxx, Secretary of Transportation; Robert O. Work, Deputy Secretary of Defense; Frank Kendall, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (AT&L); author and political pundit  Charlie Cook; Tony Tyler, Director General and CEO, International Air Transport Association; Fred Hochberg, Chairman, Export-Import Bank of the United States; and author, professor Jonah Berger.

This is first time that we’ve featured both the Deputy and Under Secretary of Defense on the podium before the full Board of Governors. They focused on existing threats, resources to address such threats, the  acquisition system, and working more closely with the private sector to meet the war fighters' needs in these budget-constrained times. Members of the Executive Committee also met with both officials during breakfast prior to the sessions.

The Board meeting included two panel discussions – both centered on budgets, funding and finance, topics of great importance to our member companies during this time of legislative budgetary uncertainty. The first panel on the future of discretionary spending for the aerospace and defense industry was moderated by Steve Bell, Senior Director, Economic Policy, Bipartisan Policy Center (former senior staff official, U.S. Senate). The panelists included G. William Hoagland (Senior Vice President, Bipartisan Policy Center, former senior staff official, U.S. Senate), Douglas Holtz-Eakin (Former Director, Congressional Budget Office, and President, American Action Forum), Charlie Houy, (Former Senate Appropriations Committee Staff Director); and Kathleen Peroff (Former Deputy Associate Director for National Security, Office of Management and Budget, and Head of Peroff & Associates, LLC). The panelists provided an in depth discussion of the challenges facing the federal budget. In particular, they focused on trends in the defense budget that are squeezing out investment in the modernization and operating accounts, such as a reluctance on the part of Congress to accept proposals to bring down the benefit and excess facility costs.  They discussed the challenges inherent in reversing the Budget Control Act caps again in 2016 and suggested that Congress and the White House must address the real cause of the budget deficit and not continue to turn to discretionary federal budgets to find minimal savings.

The second panel was titled The Financial Frontier – New Space Business Opportunities in the 21st Century. Hosted by Carissa Christensen, Managing Partner of the Tauri Group, the panel included Tim Hughes (Space X), Lesa Roe, (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), and Jim Simpson (the Boeing Company).  Their discussion brought out the new opportunities that are emerging - from traditional markets such as communications satellites and NASA-run programs, to new markets such as suborbital passenger and research missions and commercial crew transportation. Their conclusion - the space market is growing and changing in exciting ways and US industry is leading the way.

Breaking mid-day for lunch, the Civil Aviation Leadership Council heard from  former Secretary of Transportation James Burnley and former FAA Chief Operating Officer David Grizzle regarding  the current state, reform and restructuring of the U.S. air traffic control system, and NextGen implementation. This was a timely discussion given FAA’s reauthorization is up once again in 2015.

Concurrently, the Space Council held a special lunch with Lesa Roe, Deputy Associate Administrator for NASA. She discussed the Technical Capabilities Assessment Team, or TCAT - an initiative launched in 2012 and designed to ensure the agency has the right mix of skills, facilities and equipment to execute its missions in coming years - keeping America the world leader in space.

Rounding out the speakers’ program was Wharton marketing professor Berger with a presentation on how ideas, slogans and product allegiance catch on. A number of member company representatives commented that Berger was one of the best featured speakers we’ve had during our two-day Board of Governors program. It also gave a boost to the importance of social media in driving brand following, especially our Second to None Coalition.

After a long day of business sessions, attendees were surprised with a last-minute schedule change that proved to be quite the presentation. While the special dinner speaker General Stanley McChrystal was delayed by weather and only able to attend the after-dinner reception, Rear Admiral and Seal commander Scott Moore stepped in and shared some of his experiences on high-profile missions. Among the stories he told to the captive audience were the rescue of Danish Aid workers Jessica Buchanon and Poul Hagen Thisted from Somalia hostage takers, Captain Richard Phillips’ on-the-water rescue from Somalia pirates, and the raid on Osama Bin Laden’s compound.

Other highlights from the Board meeting included the premier showing of a four-minute video on the 2014 Team America Rocketry Challenge competition and the unveiling of the AIA Second To None Coalition website.

We look forward to seeing AIA members for the fall Board of Governors meeting in Scottsdale, Arizona November 19-20, 2014 – details to follow.

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Media Attacks on General Aviation, Helicopters, and UAS Require Setting the Record Straight

July 09, 2014

We recognize that many subjects related to our industry can be very complex. Accordingly, for reporters covering aerospace and defense, it often pays to take the time to provide them with detailed and useful information about their focus of interest. At AIA, we are committed to working closely with journalists to give them the background they need to get their stories right. Our communications department fields dozens of calls every day from reporters and either responds directly to information requests, sets up interviews with myself and/or our policy experts, or if appropriate, have them reach out to member companies.

Our open and helpful approach to dealing with journalists has yielded many articles we view positively including pieces in major publications about aviation safety, the implications of the budget cuts for national security, progress in space activities, and our advocacy for the Export-Import Bank of the United States.

Unfortunately, there are times when a reporter with a predisposition toward a certain and often sensationalist conclusion writes a piece without coming to us for comment or assistance in getting the facts straight. This happened twice recently, when USA Today ran a lengthy and often misleading cover story about general aviation and helicopter safety, and when the Washington Post ran a three part series implying that the domestic use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems would be unsafe based on unrelated and nonfatal incidents involving military unmanned aircraft systems often operating in the theater of war.

In cases like these, we quickly suit up and sprint out with our version of the truth, heeding the dictum of Mark Twain, who wrote, “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”  Accordingly, after the publication of both offending articles, AIA quickly put out strong statements to set the record straight. You can find our responses in the news and media section of the AIA web site.  

In response to the USA Today piece, “Unfit for Flight,” we pointed out that the story’s author had cherry-picked from the earliest period of aviation safety records for the last five decades to paint a sensationalist picture of general aviation safety, when in fact general aviation and helicopter operations have been documented to be much safer during the past 15 years, and manufacturers are working closely with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board to make more safety improvements as new technologies come on line.   

With respect to the Washington Post series, we noted that the safety record for military uses of Unmanned Aircraft Systems has markedly improved as these craft have moved from the development to operational stage. We also stated that it’s wrong to conflate the performance of far heavier systems, largely operated in combat zones and in more extreme weather and terrain conditions, with the kinds of limited UAS operations FAA is currently contemplating in the domestic air space.

On this and all subjects related to our industry, we will continue to work hard to make sure that reporters and their editors get the facts and context needed to make informed judgments about vital aerospace and defense matters.

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Nytesha Younge

July 07, 2014
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Technical Operations Council

July 03, 2014

To: Oct. 29

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Wide Area Work Flow, UID, RFID e-Business Integration Group Meeting

July 03, 2014

To: Nov. 7

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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The Business Technology Council, Information Leadership Forum

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Business Technology Interoperability Committee Meeting

July 03, 2014

To: Oct. 22

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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ISO/TC 20 Plenary (ISO standards committee for Aircraft and Space Vehicles)

July 03, 2014

To: Oct. 8

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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National Aerospace Standards Committee

July 03, 2014

To: Oct. 2

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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AIA/NDIA Industrial Security Committee Fall Meeting

July 03, 2014

To: Sep. 23

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Cost Principles Committee

July 03, 2014

To: Dec. 5

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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DPAP/OFPP/Procurement & Finance Executive Committee

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Procurement & Finance Council Executive Committee

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Workforce Policy Council Meeting

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Workforce Policy Council Chairs’ Meeting with Workforce Working Group Chairs

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Conflict Minerals Working Group

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Procurement Techniques Committee

July 03, 2014

For more information, please contact Ny Younge at nsap@aia-aerospace.org.

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Senate Aerospace Caucus

June 26, 2014

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House Aerospace Caucus

June 26, 2014

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Aerospace Caucuses

June 26, 2014

The Unted States House and Senate Aerospace Caucuses are made up of members of Congress who have a strong interest in public policy issues that affect the aerospace and defense community. These bipartisan organizations serve as forums for industry briefings to members of Congress and their staffs on the major issues that impact growth, innovation and security in the nation’s civil aviation, defense and national security and space secors of the economy.

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“When Drones Fall from the Sky” Story Falls Short

June 20, 2014

Statement by AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey on Washington Post article on unmanned aircraft systems’ safety record

Arlington, Va. — Today’s Washington Post story, “When Drones Fall from the Sky” ignores critical factors regarding safety of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in a misguided article that could frighten readers about the impending integration of UAS into the national airspace system.  From the opening sentence, the author refers to “a record of calamity that exposes the potential dangers of throwing open American skies to drone traffic,” when in fact, the safety records of military aircraft – which the author admits are improving and haven’t cost a single life – have little to do with future safe commercial operations of unmanned systems in domestic airspace on which the FAA is working diligently.

The FAA UAS integration roadmap and launch of the six designated UAS test sites highlight a systematic approach to safely integrate UAS.  We cannot overstate the importance that FAA places on safety, its primary mission.  Later this year FAA will issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on small UAS, beginning the process for seeking public comment and ultimately issuing regulations governing the use of UAS under 55 pounds.  Those systems – which are the first FAA plans to certify for domestic use – will operate within strict guidelines and only when they meet the new standards.

It’s wrong to conflate the performance of far heavier systems, largely operated in combat zones and in more extreme weather and terrain conditions, with the kinds of limited operations FAA currently is contemplating in the United States.  Military aircraft loss rates are higher when in the development and test phase; as they mature and enter full production and normal operations, loss rates decline.  Moreover, the loss rates that major military UAS systems are experiencing compare very favorably to the loss rates of manned systems at the same point in their development cycle.  Nothing leads us to believe unmanned aircraft will not be as safe or safer than manned aircraft over the long term.

Unmanned systems are an important new technology, and can perform vital safety operations as well as opening new markets for commercial enterprises.  From precision agriculture and advanced tornado research to shooting movies and photojournalism, UAS have a wide variety of future applications.  Scaring the public with unfounded comparisons will not contribute usefully to progress on integrating UAS safely into the national airspace system.

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AIA Welcomes Progress On New Alternative Jet Fuel Pathway

June 20, 2014

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey on approval of new cleaner, alternative jet fuel

Arlington, Va. — The Aerospace Industries Association and its member companies welcome the continued progress towards the commercialization of sustainable alternative jet fuels, with the approval for use of a third alternative fuel specification. As new pathways are identified and certified for aircraft use, U.S. and world operators step closer to the use of cleaner alternative fuels to meet projected passenger growth.

ASTM International, a standards-development organization, has approved a new bio-derived fuel annex that ensures the properties of a new fuel, produced from hydroprocessed fermented sugars, when blended with conventional jet fuel.  When used, the blended fuel does not require changes to the aircraft or aircraft systems.

The previously approved alternative fuels are produced from plant oils and animal processing waste and conversion of biomass and fossil fuel feedstocks. Combined government and industry research and development efforts are resulting in alternative fuels that are likely to produce 80 percent lower lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. 

Developing sustainable alternative fuels is an integral part of the industry goal to achieve carbon neutral growth from the year 2020.  It also contributes to the U.S. government goal of producing one billion gallons of alternative jet fuel by 2018.  AIA supports the continued efforts to develop new fuel pathways that encourage increased commercial production of alternate fuels.

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IUID/RFID

June 20, 2014

New DoD requirements for identification of parts and consignments demand that information is gathered and aggregated up the supply chain. These guidelines offer a range of alternative file formats and transfer mechanisms that will facilitate companies of all sizes delivering the necessary information electronically in conjunction with their products, expediting compliance and payment.

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Ohio STEM Workforce Call-to-Action Forum

June 19, 2014

To: Oct. 2

For more information, please contact Susan Lavrakas at susan.lavrakas@aia-aerospace.org.

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USA Today Flying Blind

June 18, 2014

Statement by AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey on misleading article on general aviation’s safety record

Arlington, Va. — Today’s USA Today story, “Unfit for Flight” ignores overwhelming evidence of improving general aviation safety in a misguided effort to paint aerospace manufacturers in a bad light.  Going back through five decades of accident data significantly distorts the marked decline in both fatal and non-fatal accidents that occurred from 1999 to 2011, with fatal accidents falling 24 percent and non-fatal accidents falling 29 percent over that time period according to GAO’s October 2012 report on general aviation safety.  In fact, according to the GAO, the majority of general aviation accidents result in no injuries at all – a far cry from USA Today's screaming headlines.

Looking for corporate villains, the story irresponsibly implies that the aircraft manufacturing industry is an overwhelming contributor to general aviation accidents.  This ignores the facts and cherry-picks anecdotal data to present a grossly misleading picture.  The aviation industry is engaged in ongoing efforts in close cooperation with NTSB and FAA to improve safety both in terms of equipment and pilot training.  For instance, FAA’s Alaskan Capstone project deploys ADS-B technologies in places where radar cannot work to provide better guidance and reduce the accident rate.  Many Alaskan communities are dependent on general aviation services to connect them with the world; the effort to increase safety in that area stands as just one example of industry partnering with government to improve the lives of everyday citizens.

As a former Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration and Chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, I also know from personal experience that the picture of these dedicated agencies painted by USA Today is inaccurate and unfair.  General aviation performs a vital role in our economy, linking American communities, helping save countless lives in emergency situations and providing early training for the pilots who fly our commercial and military aircraft.  Fair reporting would show nationwide trends, include recent data and recognize laudable manufacturing industry efforts to improve safety in close coordination with our government.  The public, and the hundreds of thousands of people who rely on our aircraft, deserve better.

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Reagan Would Have Fought For Ex-Im Bank

June 18, 2014

A version of this article appears in the June 9 edition of Aviation Week & Space Technology and in Aviation Week online on June 17.

In the decade since Ronald Reagan’s death, appraisals of the U.S.’s 40th president have focused on his policies’ bold colorings. To help end the Cold War, he first demonstrated to Soviet leaders the folly of trying to keep up with a technologically advanced American military. Reagan’s economic policies also unapologetically advanced the interests of American workers and businesses when he saw foreign competitors had the advantage of an unlevel playing field.

As someone who proudly served President Reagan, I believe it is important to address his legacy now, precisely because some members of his party in Congress are turning their back on it. They have accepted excessive national security cuts in an increasingly dangerous world due to their stubborn adherence to fiscal austerity. And they refuse to support government institutions such as the Export Import Bank (Ex-Im) of the United States, which allows American companies to compete for business abroad and create jobs here at home.

Ex-Im goes toe-to-toe against other nations’ export credit agencies to enable American companies to compete internationally based on price, product and quality instead of favorable financing. Ex-Im supports U.S. exports when private finance is unable or unwilling to step in. During his presidency, Reagan strongly backed Ex-Im, albeit with necessary reforms. He requested an increase in Ex-Im’s lending limit on loan guarantees by more than 12% or $1.1 billion. One of his budget requests stated that supporting export financing on a “substantial scale” is “consistent with the [Ex-Im] Bank’s legitimate role in overcoming limitations in private credit markets.” That does not sound like someone who opposed the Bank.

Also consistent with Reagan’s views is Ex-Im’s critical role today in assisting Main Street U.S. businesses. In 2013, the bank aided more than 3,400 companies—nearly 90% of them small businesses—and supported more than 205,000 U.S. jobs in all 50 states. The indirect impact of the bank is also substantial when considering the small- and medium-sized supply chain companies that benefit when a product is exported. The bank evaluates all transactions it receives for potential adverse economic impact. And last year, Ex-Im earned more than $1 billion for the U.S. Treasury. In addition, a newly released Congressional Budget Office report estimates that Ex-Im would earn $14 billion over 10 years using the accounting methods currently required by law. That, along with a 0.0237% default rate, is an enviable record of achievement.

The U.S. aerospace industry, which must expand exports in order to mitigate somewhat the negative effects of excessive budget cuts, relies greatly on Ex-Im. The Bank ensures that the suppliers for manufacturers of aircraft, helicopters, commercial satellites, spacecraft and launch vehicles are able to participate in an ever-expanding global marketplace. And if you add to original equipment sales the significant orders for aftermarket parts and components generated by U.S. aerospace exports, it is clear that Ex-Im contributes significantly to the strength of our nation’s industrial manufacturing base and to our industry’s track record of generating the largest trade surplus of any manufacturing sector.

Despite Ex-Im’s positive role, the bank’s small, but vocal group of opponents in Congress seeks to block its required reauthorization this fall. They assert Ex-Im financing represents the government picking winners and losers. This is not the case: Any U.S. company that wants to compete globally can come to the bank to help turn good export opportunities into sales. If Ex-Im’s opponents are successful, their blocking move would amount to economic unilateral disarmament against 60 other nations whose export credit agencies aggressively support their businesses, often with massive subsidies. Certainly our foreign competitors would love to see it eliminated and the playing field tilted in their favor, but the job of our government is to advance American competitiveness. Who would have thought that some elected officials and “think” tanks would take foreign competitors’ side of the argument?

I urge readers to reach out to their members of Congress to call for action to reauthorize Ex-Im prior to Oct. 1. As President Reagan said in his 1983 State of the Union Address, “We must have adequate export financing to sell American products overseas.”

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Miles Lifson

June 11, 2014

Miles Lifson is the Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) manager of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA). He is responsible for the planning and execution of all aspects of TARC - the aerospace industry’s signature science, technology, engineering and mathematics program. TARC is the world’s largest model rocket competition for middle and high school students.  Lifson coordinates sponsorships and partnerships; and works with hundreds of schools across the country. He regularly interfaces with the National Association of Rocketry, NASA and DOD. Additionally, Lifson collaborates with partner countries to sustain and expand the International Rocketry Challenge.

Lifson also supports AIA's Workforce Policy Council and Industrial Base initiatives.

Prior to joining AIA, Lifson interned with Congresswoman Donna Edwards and the Space Studies Board of the National Academies.

Lifson holds bachelor’s degrees in physics and government  from Claremont McKenna College.

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Defense Acquisition Resources to Understand Acquisition Reform

June 05, 2014
AIA has complied a number of letters that address the federal defense acquisition process and ways in which reforms can be made to ensure the best value for defense customers.  They include the following letters and may be downloaded as a combined zip file below.
  • Join Working Group on Improving Cybersecurity and Resiliance Through Acquisition
  • AIA Comments on DFARS: Discllsure to Litigation Support Contractors (DFARS Case 2012-D029)
  • Federal Management Regulation; Disposal and Report of Federal Electronic Assets (Case 2012-102-4)
  • Burdens and Barriers to Contracting with the Federal Government
  • Response to October 30th Letter on BBP 2.0
  • Better Buying Power 2.0 - Commercial Items
  • Meetings with Alan Estevez, Katrina McFarland, and Dick Ginman regarding Costs of Regulation
  • FAR; Contractor Comment Period, Past Preformance Evaluations (FAR CASE 2012-028)
  • Pension Harmonization Rule Change
  • Cost Acounting Standards
  • MOCAS payment cycle times
  • DCMA Meetings regarding Corrective Action Requests
  • AIA Comments on implementation of Better Buying Power 2.0
  • AIA Comments on DFARS: Safeguarding Unclassified DoD Information (DFARS Case 2011-D039)
  • Section 818 NDAA 2012

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Letter From HASC/SASC to AIA

June 05, 2014

This letter from the House and Senate Armed Services oversight committees informed AIA that the Congress is looking into ways to improve the defense acquisition system. Specifically:

  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to reduce the cost of major defense acquisition programs;
  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to expedite the delivery of useful capabilities to the warfighter;
  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to improve how it recruits, trains, and develops its acquisition workforce;
  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to empower key acquisition personnel, such as program managers and cost estimators, to make sound choices through the acquisition process;
  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to improve planning, contracting, oversight and management of services; and
  • Steps that DOD or Congress could take to incentivize timely delivery of capabilities and services to warfighters with considerations for life-cycle costs.

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Daniel D. Faoro

June 02, 2014

Dan Faoro is Vice President of Membership and Business Development for the Aerospace Industries Association. He is responsible for recruitment and retention activities of AIA’s membership, new business development and executing and improving member services to include corporate events.

Dan brings extensive association experience in membership outreach, marketing and revenue generation.  Prior to joining AIA in 2014, he served as the Vice President and Assistant to the President for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) where he was responsible for major outreach programs to critical segments of AOPA’s broad membership and a variety of business development initiatives. Prior to AOPA, Dan spent six years as Vice President of Marketing and Communications for the National Association of Chain Drug Stores where he worked extensively on activities to sustain and generate revenue. He also served as the Director of Communications for the Office of Management and Administration at the White House during President George W. Bush’s first term and he spent five years as Director of Marketing for a DC based publishing company.

Dan has a private pilot certificate and holds a B.A. in Economics from George Mason University.

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AIA Names Faoro Vice President for Membership Services and Business Development

May 30, 2014

Arlington, Va. — Daniel D. Faoro has joined the Aerospace Industries Association as Vice President for Membership Services and Business Development, bringing extensive association experience in membership outreach, marketing and revenue generation.

“Dan is an outstanding addition to the AIA team and we’re delighted to bring him on board,” said AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey. “We are a multi-faceted industry with many opportunities and challenges – his experience in aviation and large association management will help us maintain outstanding service to our members.”

Most recently, Faoro served as the Vice President and Assistant to the President for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association where he was responsible for major outreach to AOPA’s broad membership and a variety of business development initiatives.  Prior to AOPA, he spent six years as Vice President of Marketing and Communications for the National Association of Chain Drug Stores where he worked extensively on activities to sustain and generate revenue. 

Faoro also served as the Director of Communications in the Office of Management and Administration at the White House during President George W. Bush’s first term.  He has a private pilot certificate and holds a B.A. in economics from George Mason University.

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The New American Space Age

May 29, 2014

Across the government and private sectors, more vehicles are now being built for human spaceflight than at any other point in history. Today’s NASA human spaceflight program is an ecosystem of diverse activity – developing both exploration systems and commercial transportation services. These elements are strategically linked to one another and vital to the success of the overall human spaceflight program.

In the field of suborbital spaceflight, private companies are developing spacecraft to take hundreds of paying customers briefly into space. If current trends continue, the suborbital market is predicted to have baseline revenue of $600 million over the first 10 years of operations. Already, one suborbital space transportation company, Virgin Galactic, is nearing 800 deposits for paying customers.

In low Earth orbit, three companies have won the most recent round of NASA funding, known as Commercial Crew Integrated Capabilities to develop new space transportation systems to the International Space Station (ISS) and open potential new markets for space transportation: Boeing, Sierra Nevada and SpaceX. All three have made steady progress to build U.S. domestic access to
the ISS and end our dependency on the Russians. 

For deep space exploration, the space industry is building vehicles to extend our reach further into the solar system than we have ever gone before. To expand human access to the solar system, two foundational vehicles are being built – a new heavy lift rocket called the Space Launch System and the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle called Orion. Orion will serve as the primary spacecraft to send NASA astronauts to destinations beyond low Earth orbit. Just as the Space Shuttle was a vehicle with many uses – from scientific experimentation, satellite servicing and space station construction – NASA’s next generation exploration vehicles will be equipped to take on multiple mission types for deep space exploration.

The human spaceflight programs established in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 and agreed upon by the White House and Congress have made incredible progress. By continuing steady and consistent support for these programs, exploration programs and commercial space transportation services will extend our reach farther than we’ve ever gone before – all for the benefit of life on Earth.

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All-Girl Rocketry Team Answers Presidential Call for Increased Female Engagement in STEM

May 27, 2014

Students showcase rockets for President Obama at fourth White House Science Fair

Washington, D.C. – Team Rocket Power, an all-girl team from Maryland that competed in the 2014 Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC), exhibited their rockets for President Obama at the White House Science Fair this morning. The three-girl team was invited to join the White House's celebration of a range of national programs that encourage students to engage and excel in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

This year's Fair hosts students from a number of competitions across the country and there is a specific focus on girls and women who are excelling in STEM-related fields and inspiring younger students with their work. Tenth graders Jasmyn Logan and Nia'mani Robinson and high school senior Rebecca Chapin-Ridgley are doing just that.

“These girls have truly answered the President's call for closing the gap for women and other underrepresented groups to excel in STEM-related fields,” said AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey. “This is the fourth year one of our teams has been invited to participate in the White House Science Fair and the second all-girl team to exhibit. I think this speaks volumes of the positive influence STEM programs like TARC have on our future workforce.”

Representing Prince George’s and Anne Arundel counties in Maryland, Team Rocket Power was one of 18 all-girl TARC teams in this year's competition. The 2014 TARC competition challenged students to design and build a rocket that could fly to 825 feet and back within 48 to 50 seconds while carrying precious cargo — two raw eggs that must return to the ground undamaged with the assistance of two parachutes.

TARC has proven to be an invaluable source of inspiration over its 12-year history, attracting young talent to STEM-focused areas of study and, ultimately, careers. A 2010 survey of TARC alumni found that 80 percent of respondents went on to major in related technical fields. Sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association, the National Association of Rocketry (NAR) and more than 20 industry partners, TARC provides middle and high school students the opportunity to design, build and launch model rockets in an annual competition among more than 5,000 students nationwide.

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Time to reverse the budget caps

May 23, 2014

We’re often asked why the aerospace and defense industry and groups advocating for government’s core domestic functions are jointly fighting the severe cuts to defense and non-defense discretionary (NDD) programs imposed by the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011.

From Fiscal Years 2016 to 2019 the cuts will cap the defense budget at a level $115 billion below what the Defense Department says is minimally required to meet our national security needs, and place similar shackles on the ability of domestic federal agencies to invest in the health and well being of our people.  Yet, many assume we are polar opposites battling each other for slices of the shrinking budget pie. 

The truth is our groups have much in common, and we don’t believe the status quo is tenable.  NDD United recognizes without the contributions of aerospace and defense companies, such vital domestic government activities as weather forecasting, air traffic management, and medical research on the International Space Station wouldn’t be possible.  Further, the aerospace and defense industry knows the education, health, job training, and research programs that NDD-United champions in addition to benefitting society, bolster our industrial base.
To keep America strong and avoid doing long-term damage to the economy, we both understand there’s a point at which mindless budget cutting harms the nation’s security in an increasingly volatile world, and undermines the potential of the economy to grow and improve everyone’s life.  And we also believe it is bad policy, as the BCA requires, for the Defense Department and the domestic agencies, which represent only 40 percent of the federal budget, to be forced to shoulder nearly 100 percent of the budget cuts.

The potential impacts of the cuts were illustrated in stark relief recently when the Pentagon issued its report, “Estimated Impacts of Sequestration-Level Funding,” fulfilling Defense Secretary Hagel’s commitment to lay out in specific detail the effects on national defense of the budget caps.   Under the budget law, “Our forces will assume substantial additional risks in certain missions and will continue to face significant readinesss and modernization challenges,” warns the report. “These impacts would leave our military unbalanced and eventually too small to meet the needs of our strategy fully.”  The specifics are sobering: The Army and Marine Corps will be forced to shrink to pre-World War II levels, training will be sacrificed yet again, and the part of the budget that provide our war fighters with the equipment that they need to survive in modern day and future warfare will be slashed by  more than $66 billion. 

The public also deserves to know the implications of the BCA caps on the domestic side of the ledger, including activities such as air traffic control, medical research and innovative treatments, Coast Guard search and rescue, border patrol, food and water safety inspection, jobs training and national parks management.  Unfortunately, we don’t have that information from the other agencies, but the American people need it so they know what choices they are being forced to make by indiscriminate caps to the federal discretionary budget.

The good and underreported news as policy makers consider alternatives to the budget caps is that substantial progress is being made toward  reducing the debt and deficit.  A recent Congressional Budget Office report notes the U.S. government’s deficit has fallen almost a third below fiscal year 2013 and will shrink again next year.   Now is a time to recalibrate and recognize that cutting away our nation’s investments in future security, innovation and the well being of our people is not a recipe for long-term success.

Decision makers need to recognize that the arbitrary and unchanging budget caps have real consequences in the lives of Americans.  They need to recognize that times and circumstances have changed since the BCA was signed.    We have all watched Congress contort itself into knots, consuming valuable time searching for piecemeal workarounds to make austerity workable, while our military, police, scientists, teachers, elderly and children get less support even as the global environment grows more competitive and more dangerous.  It’s time to eliminate the BCA  caps, and empower future Congresses to perform one of their most fundamental missions – reviewing and providing for the needs of the nation, each year, based on current economic, social and national security circumstances.

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AIA Launches Second to None Coalition

May 22, 2014

This brand new Coalition was formed to unite America's aerospace and defense workers, active and retired military personnel and broad supporters of national security, aviation and space in a common cause to preserve America’s role as the global leader in aerospace and defense.

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Events for AIA Members

May 15, 2014

Non-AIA Members click here to register for the U.S Industry Reception.

REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED FOR THE AMBASSADOR'S RECEPTION.

On behalf of the Aerospace Industries Association, it is our pleasure to invite you to attend AIA's premier events during the Farnborough Air Show, July 13-20, 2014. We truly appreciate your support and involvement in AIA, and we hope you'll be able to join us.

Please read carefully the following details regarding AIA's events. Contact Audrey Murphy, Manager of Corporate Events, at 703-358-1094 or audrey.murphy@aia-aerospace.org with any questions.

AIA's premier events are open to ALL AIA members - both Full and Associate - including the AIA Grand Reception in Honor of the President's Representative.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The deadline to purchase tickets for the U.S. Industry Reception (Ambassador's Reception) is July 8, 2014 - no exceptions. The Embassy has stated only the names submitted by July 8 will have the security clearance to enter the residence.  In addition, there cannot be any changes made to the names after July 8.  DO NOT DELAY IN REGISTERING FOR THIS EVENT.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the AIA Grand Reception in Honor of the President's Representative is July 10, 2014.

No refunds will be given after Friday, June 6.

Tickets for both events will be emailed to those who register.

2014 AIA FARNBOROUGH AIR SHOW EVENTS

SUNDAY, JULY 13, 2014

Aerospace Industries Association's Grand Reception in Honor of the U.S. President's Representative

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Grosvenor House Hotel
Ballroom
Park Lane, London

  • Cost: $250 per person
  • Description: AIA’s exclusive reception in honor of the President’s Representative to the Farnborough Air Show. Attendees will include U.S. governors, senators, CEOs of the premiere civil and defense companies, and select foreign delegations.
  • Ticket Information: Full and Associate AIA Members can purchase tickets.
  • Event Details:
    1. Attire is business for men and cocktail dresses for women.
    2. Invitations are non-transferable.
    3. The original invitation is required to be admitted to the reception.

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 2014

 

U.S. Industry Reception (Ambassador's Reception)

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
U.S. Ambassador's Residence
London

  • Cost: $150 per person
  • Description: Reception hosted by the U.S. Ambassador, Matthew Barzun, at the Ambassador's residence, for CEOs of the premiere civil and defense companies, air show exhibitors, U.S. government officials, and foreign delegations.
  • Ticket Information: Full and Associate AIA Members can purchase tickets.
  • Event Details:
    1. Attire is business for men and cocktail dresses for women.
    2. Invitations are non-transferable.
    3. Attendees must show their invitation along with a government-issued picture ID to be allowed to enter the residence.
    4. To avoid long lines at the entrance to the residence, the entry times will be staggered by 15 minutes (7:30 pm and 7:45 pm) based on first come, first served basis.  Please pay close attention to the arrival time printed on your invitation, as entrance will be only allowed at that time.

Note: No refunds will be given after Friday, June 6, 2014.

CORRAL TOURS

The U.S. Corral is open to all AIA members (both Full and Associate) on Monday through Friday, July 14-18, 2014. Please stop by the AIA chalet and sign out a corral pass with our receptionist. The AIA member must show an official U.S. government issued picture ID (driver's license or passport). The corral pass must be returned to the receptionist at the end of your tour. Five people can accompany an AIA member on the tour.

Note: No refunds will be given after Friday, June 6, 2014.

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U.S. Industry Reception

May 15, 2014

AIA Members click here for details about the U.S Industry Reception.

REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED FOR THE AMBASSADOR'S RECEPTION.

On behalf of the Aerospace Industries Association, it is our pleasure to invite you to attend AIA's premier event during the Farnborough Air Show, July 13-20, 2014.

Please read carefully the following details regarding AIA's event. Contact Audrey Murphy, Manager of Corporate Events, at 703-358-1094 or audrey.murphy@aia-aerospace.org with any questions.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The deadline to purchase tickets for the U.S. Industry Reception (Ambassador's Reception) has been extended to July 8, 2014. The Embassy has stated only the names submitted by July 8 will have the security clearance to enter the residence. In addition, there cannot be any changes made to the names after July 8.  DO NOT DELAY IN REGISTERING FOR THIS EVENT.

No refunds will be given after Friday, June 6.

Tickets will be emailed to those who register.

AIA EVENTS

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 2014

U.S. Industry Reception (Ambassador's Reception)

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
U.S. Ambassador's Residence
London

  • Cost: $150 per person
  • Description: Reception hosted by the U.S. Ambassador, Matthew Barzun, at the Ambassador's residence, for CEOs of the premiere civil and defense companies, air show exhibitors, U.S. government officials, and foreign delegations.
  • Ticket Information: Full and Associate AIA Members can purchase tickets.
  • Event Details:
    1. Attire is business for men and cocktail dresses for women.
    2. Invitations are non-transferable.
    3. Attendees must show their invitation along with a government-issued picture ID to be allowed to enter the residence.
    4. To avoid long lines at the entrance to the residence, the entry times will be staggered by 15 minutes (7:30 pm and 7:45 pm) based on first come, first served basis.  Please pay close attention to the arrival time printed on your invitation, as entrance will be only allowed at that time.

Note: No refunds will be given after Friday, June 6, 2014.

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Farnborough Airshow

May 15, 2014

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AIA Supports Lifting of Export Restrictions on U.S. Space Systems

May 13, 2014

Together with Ex-Im Reauthorization later this year, the Interim Final Rule will open the door to increased international space-related sales

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey 

Arlington, Va. — The Aerospace Industries Association applauds the Administration’s issuance of revisions to Category XV of the U.S. Munitions List (USML) that will end excessive restrictions on space systems like commercial satellites and related articles.  After a six month delayed implementation, the interim final rule will remove many of these less sensitive technologies from the USML and place them under the more appropriate controls of the Commerce Control List. 

In a 2012 report, AIA estimated that U.S. manufacturers lost $21 billion in satellite revenue from 1999 to 2009, costing about 9,000 direct jobs annually once USML controls were applied to commercial satellites.  This rule implements legislation passed by Congress in early 2013 allowing the Administration to once again have discretion to control these technologies for export. 

This revision, together with the re-authorization of the Export-Import Bank by Congress later this year, would dramatically level the global market playing field and greatly enhance the prospects for U.S. companies selling space related goods and services overseas.  As indicated in our new report on ExIm Bank, the projected international market outside the United States for satellite manufacturing and launch services through 2021 is $132 billion, with developing markets in South America and the Middle East experiencing a steady increase in growth.  Ex-Im Bank increasingly provides the export financing that helps U.S. space manufacturers compete on a level playing field for foreign customers. 

Both actions are required for the United States to maintain a strong industrial base, support our efforts in manned space flight and boost space-related jobs.  In 2012, the Administration’s budget request for 2013 non-classified military space programs was $8 billion.  Through sequestration-related cuts that number has been reduced $7.2 billion – a 10 percent reduction even as potential adversaries continue to grow their space investments and capabilities.  While government spending on space has declined, the space market is rapidly changing with new opportunities in commercial space emerging.  It therefore has become even more important to increase the space sector’s sales in the commercial arena and enhance its global competiveness. 

AIA expresses its appreciation to the Administration and Congress for the removal of these stringent export controls on essentially commercial space technologies, and encourages them to work together again to make our companies and their space products and services more competitive in the international marketplace by supporting the reauthorization of the Ex-Im Bank.

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Leveling the Playing Field: The Ex-Im Bank & U.S. Manufacturing

May 12, 2014

In the wake of an uneven global economic recovery, countries are competing in an unprecedented race to create jobs and stimulate economic growth through increased exports. In this competition, not all countries abide by the same set of rules that the United States follows to support their companies' exports. Indeed, American companies often come up against government-owned, government-protected or government-subsidized competitors from countries such as China, Brazil, India and various European nations, making for a brutally competitive and uneven playing field.

In this race, the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im Bank) serves as a critical engine for U.S. jobs by leveling the playing field and helping American companies to compete toe-to-toe against their competitors in the global marketplace. Ex-Im Bank is acting as a vital catalyst of U.S. economic growth, enabling billions of dollars of exports and supporting hundreds of thousands of export-related U.S. jobs. In 2013 alone, Ex-Im Bank transactions promoted $34.7 billion of exports in fields such as power turbines, locomotives, agricultural equipment and satellites, and sustained or created more than 205,000 American jobs.

AIA believes that American companies can continue to compete and win in the global marketplace against their overseas counterparts, but they cannot do it with one hand tied behind their backs. Foreign competitors continue to enjoy significant financial assistance from their governments. To protect the competitiveness of our industry and American manufacturing, we need to ensure the Ex-Im Bank has the long-term support from Congress it needs to support and grow the American manufacturing workforce.

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Georgia Students Win Rocket Contest

May 10, 2014

Students from Creekview High School of Canton, Ga. outperformed hundreds of their peers from across the country Saturday to earn first place at the twelfth annual Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC).

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Georgia Students Take First Place in Team America Rocketry Challenge Finals

May 10, 2014

STEM contest winners to represent U.S. at international fly-off in England

Contest winners with Raytheon's Rick Hunt, Vice President of Navy and Marine Corps Programs, in front of the Raytheon exhibit. Winners left to right: Andrew White, 16; Bailey Robertson, 15; Amanda Semler, 18; Austin Bralick, 16; Nick Dimos, 16.

The Plains, Va. – Students from Creekview High School of Canton, Ga. outperformed hundreds of their peers from across the country Saturday to earn first place at the twelfth annual Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC). Champions Amanda Semler, 18; Andrew White, 16; Nick Dimos, 16; Austin Bralick, 16; and Bailey Robertson, 15; bested more than 700 other teams representing 48 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands to earn the national title.

TARC is the world’s largest student rocket contest and the aerospace and defense industry’s flagship program designed to encourage students to pursue study and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Sponsored by the Aerospace Industries Association, the National Association of Rocketry (NAR) and more than 20 industry partners, TARC provides middle and high school students the opportunity to design, build and launch model rockets in a competition among more than 5,000 students nationwide.

“I’m a senior, so this is a dream come true,” said Semler, who is also the team’s captain. “We’re so thankful for the chance to come to the nation’s capital, and to Raytheon for the chance to go to England.”

The 2014 challenge was one of the most difficult in TARC’s history. Students were tasked with designing and building a rocket that could fly to 825 feet and back within 48 to 50 seconds while carrying precious cargo — two raw eggs that must return to the ground undamaged. The dual-parachute requirement combined with the tight timing window and other structural criteria required nearly six months of diligent preparation by the teams.

“We are very proud of our 2014 champions and the incredible effort all of the teams put into the competition this year,” said AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey. “Many of these students spent months developing and perfecting their rockets for the finals. That level of drive and perseverance will serve them well in college and as they prepare to enter the workforce. Our industry feels very fortunate to have such a talented incoming cohort.”
 

As a strong supporter of women in STEM, TARC is proud of the many all-girl teams that compete each year. Here the Purple Pumas, from Clear Falls High School in TX, leave the Raython sponsored community tent.  

Over its 12-year tenure TARC has proven to be an invaluable contributor of young talent to STEM-focused areas of study and, ultimately, careers over its tenure. A 2010 survey of TARC alumni found that 80 percent of respondents went on to major in related technical fields.

With all teams aiming for a perfect score of zero, the Creekview High School logged a combined score of 14.88. They will travel to England in July to compete in an international fly-off against student teams from the U.K. and France at the Farnborough Air Show.  In addition, $60,000 in scholarships and other prizes will be split among the competition's top 10 placing teams.

AIA has partnered with Raytheon to broaden the TARC program to the global stage. The 2014 champions will be the ninth consecutive team Raytheon has supported to travel to the international air show as part of the company’s broad-based MathMovesU® initiative to encourage students to pursue careers in STEM. Additional funding and prizes are provided by more than 20 industry partners including Lockheed Martin Corporation and Space Exploration Technologies Corporation.

For additional information on TARC, complete competition results and a full list of this year's sponsors, please visit www.rocketcontest.org.

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TARC Teams Flock to Capitol Hill for Rockets on the Hill

May 09, 2014

Rocket contest teams stand in front of the "Mountains and Clouds" sculpture in the Hart Senate Office Building.

Hundreds of middle and high school students descended on Capitol Hill the morning of Friday, May 9, for the third annual Rockets on the Hill reception. Part of the Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC) National Finals festivities, Rockets on the Hill is an opportunity for students to meet with their elected representatives and talk about the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education.

Guest speakers included Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.), representing technological hotbed Silicon Valley; Dr. John Langford, Chairman and CEO of Aurora Flight Sciences; and former astronaut and Associate Administrator for Education at NASA Leland Melvin.  Several members of Congress attended or sent staff members to meet with the students from their district and hear their youthful perspective on aerospace and hands on experience with rocket science.

The TARC National Final flyoff will be held Saturday, May 10, at Great Meadow at The Plains, Va.  One hundred teams will compete for the right to be called national champions and to compete against teams from the UK and France at the Farnborough International Airshow outside of London in July.  The winners will receive a fully-sponsored trip to Farnborough courtesy of the Raytheon Company.

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Rockets on the Hill

May 09, 2014

Hundreds of middle and high school students descended on Capitol Hill the morning of Friday, May 9, for the third annual Rockets on the Hill reception.

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Reauthorize the Export-Import Bank

May 07, 2014

The Export-Import Bank has, for more than 80 years, stood as a bipartisan institution that has fueled economic growth in the U.S. by helping businesses export goods globally. In 2013, the Bank earned $1.1 billion dollars for American taxpayers, supported more than $37 billion of U.S. exports, and maintained 205,000 American jobs.

Even as the Bank’s benefits are clearly defined, certain elected officials still stand in the way of American growth and seek to impede the success of small businesses. It is past time that these elected officials wakeup to the need for the Bank and support its reauthorization.

That is why AIA is dedicated to spreading the word about the need to reauthorize the Bank and we have highlighted just a few of those efforts below.

AIA's ad supporting the Ex-Im Bank shows how it has been supported by well known figures from both political parties for decades and why it should still be supported today.

 

AIA's Ex-Im Bank Ad

This infographic is a helpful resource to learn more about the Ex-Im Bank.

 

Infographic

AIA's latest report on the Ex-Im Bank highlights the importance that the organization plays in boosting America's ability to compete in global manufacturing. 

 

Leveling the Playing Field

 

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The U.S. Export-Import Bank

May 07, 2014

The Export-Import Bank of the U.S. is responsible for allowing businesses to export their products globally. It has for decades helped level to playing field for domestic export, build the U.S. economy by being a self-sustaining organization that returns money to American taxpayers and supports small businesses and jobs in America.

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The Ex-Im Bank Makes America Stronger

May 07, 2014

American presidents from both parties have supported the Ex-Im Bank for more than 80 years; including Ronald Reagan, John F. Kennedy and George W. Bush.

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Playing Politics with National Security is a Transatlantic Mistake

May 02, 2014

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey

Arlington, Va. — These past few days we’ve observed a particularly high level of concern from both Secretary of Defense Hagel and former Secretary Panetta about the magnitude of current global threats.  In addition to the escalating Russian aggression in the Ukraine, still with us is the conflict in Syria, and challenges from North Korea, Iran, Al Qaeda and others. What has largely fallen off the radar of our news, and to a large degree the attention of the American Congress, is the fact that the draconian budget caps still threaten our national security.  The Defense Department warns that funding under the budget caps in FY 16 and beyond is well below what is minimally required to meet our national security needs.
 
Noting this year’s mid-term elections, former Secretary Panetta said in a Wall Street Journal op-ed this week, “our national leaders cannot just give up until the next election.”  “Events in a dangerous world will not wait for the next election.”  Echoing his predecessor’s concern, today Secretary Hagel addressed the ill-conceived perception that the “age of aggression in Europe” is over, stating that “Russia’s actions in Ukraine shatter that myth.”  Secretary Hagel went on to call on NATO members in Europe to “step up” and begin shouldering a greater share of the cost of our alliance.  Clearly, playing political games with national security budgets is a transatlantic flaw shared by the U.S. government and our NATO allies. 

And a key voice of European industry also weighed in this week.  Tom Enders, CEO of Airbus addressed the Atlantic Council and directed his concern with investment in NATO to his own European leaders.  Enders said “perhaps the events in Ukraine are more effective in halting the downward trend” in defense spending. 

America and our allies must not let history repeat itself.  As Secretary Panetta said this week, “after every major conflict in recent history, deep defense cuts hollowed out the military.”  Once again, our industry calls on Congress and the Administration to break with this dangerous tradition.  Events worldwide demand action now.  We must find a solution to the $115 billion in defense cuts slated to begin in the coming years, now.  The cuts are sending a message of weakness to aggressors.  Mr. Putin, Mr. Kim and Mr. al-Assad are highly unlikely to stand down while we conduct our mid-term elections.

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Sectors

May 02, 2014

Civil Aviation

Civil Aviation

Today, civil aerospace manufacturers produce some of the most powerful aircraft engines in the world which accompany the most advanced navigation equipment, best structural designs, and most fuel efficient systems ever created.


Defense & Security

Defense & Security

At AIA we are committed to remaining up to date with changing business environments. To do this it is necessary from time to time to reevaluate the need for certain councils, committees and working groups.


International

International

The International Division at AIA is responsible for promoting domestic an international policies and practices that help American companies compete in the global marketplace and cooperate with our allies and foreign partners.


Civil & Commercial Space

Space Systems

Our space capabilities are a source of national pride and an investment in the science and R&D needed to maintain U.S. global competitiveness.

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AIA Internship Program

May 02, 2014

AIA relies on interns to support a wide array of activities, ranging from policy and regulatory advocacy to marketing and event support. the subject line. To apply, please submit a resume and to  jobs[at]aia-aerospace.org and include your requested department.

AIA is looking to fill internships in all of our major functional areas including:

Aerospace Research Center

Civil Aviation

Communications/Public Relations

Legislative Affairs

Membership

National Security and Acquisition Policy

Space 

Internships are flexible depending on students’ schedules.  Interns are eligible to receive a monthly stipend. All submissions should be sent to:  jobs@aia-aerospace.org

Aerospace Research Center

The Research Intern contributes to all activities undertaken by the Research Department, under the guidance of the Research Manager.  Projects typically involve quantitative research related to the U.S. and foreign aerospace markets.  While the majority of projects are quantitative in nature, many involve presenting the research findings in written reports, briefs, and position papers.  Consequently, strong writing skills are also frequently utilized.

Primary Activities:
• Researches and prepares Aerospace Facts and Figures, a statistical handbook used worldwide as the authoritative compendium of U.S. aerospace industry data
• Maintains AIA databases; this frequently involves use of Microsoft Excel and Access
• Produces written, tabular, and visual materials for research reports, presentations, and publication
• Summarizes, revises, or interprets complex or specialized literature for general audiences
• Composes and edits specialized reports for internal or external circulation; proofreads material for publication

Civil Aviation

Communications/Public Relations

AIA is seeking a dynamic, motivated individual to join the communications team for an internship. AIA represents the largest aerospace and defense industry players before Congress and the administration. The communications team facilitates that interaction through publicity, media outreach and coordinating efforts among members with a broad diversity of interests. We have a number of special events this year, including the first-ever National Aerospace Week, an Executive Committee meeting and our 45th Annual Year-End Review & Forecast Luncheon. We are looking for a communications or journalism major to help out in all aspects of our busy office. Duties include: writing articles for newsletter, web site features and press releases; helping organize meetings and other event planning; and special projects. Join us for a first-hand look at the conjunction of industry and policy!

Legislative Affairs

Membership Intern

Work with an exciting team at the most prominent aerospace related association in the United States.  AIA’s membership department manages, coordinates and supports AIA’s over one-hundred full members – companies like Lockheed Martin, The Boeing Company, ITT, GE, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, General Dynamics, Textron, Rolls Royce, and a host of other top notch global aerospace primes and suppliers make up the regular membership.  One of membership’s most critical tasks is organizing and staffing AIA’s annual Members and Board of Governors Meetings.  There are two major meetings held by AIA during the year.  To assist and support our annual events, AIA is looking for an intern that is motivated, well organized, has a pleasant personal and telephone demeanor, writes well, and can work at a fast pace with a great team of AIA professionals.  Reaching out to members, assisting with organizational and administrative aspects of the event, attending and supporting the events, assisting our civil, space, and international divisions organize CEO and senior management briefings, and many other tasks make up the duties.  We also have an exciting membership campaign underway and a host of other tasks.

National Security and Acquisition Policy

Technical Operations

AIA has an open position for an intern who could assist on a project in the technical operations area.  This project is coordinated by AIA for a group of experienced aerospace engineers who are responsible for the maintenance of the National Aerospace Standards (Fasteners) of the aerospace industry.

The project requires digitizing several hundred drawings, transferring text data and technical drawings into a standardized electronic template, and preparing a document for release to the NAS Committee.  The AIA assumes professional responsibility for the work being done.

Qualifications:
We are looking for someone who is familiar with general engineering principles, such as product specifications and technical drawing skills.  The candidate should have experience with AutoCAD systems.  The workflow of the project includes electronic, virtual as well as paper-based documentation and discussion; good communication skills are therefore very desirable.

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Public Comments Sought on Acquisition Reform

April 24, 2014

The Federal government’s acquisition regulations have grown into a demanding and complicated regime costing the nation millions of dollars just for compliance. 

This week, the Chief Acquisition Officers Council, in collaboration with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, the Chief Information Officers Council and the Federal Acquisition Regulation Council launched a new website seeking public comments to help craft “an efficient and effective acquisition system that maximizes the value of every taxpayer dollar.” 

This is a welcome dialogue.  AIA has been urging government to eliminate the unnecessary burdens on both industry and government that are present in today’s contracting process. Reducing the acquisition burden on industry and government will do more than just lower all-around costs, it will also help ensure the health and security of the industrial base is sustained.

The Chief Acquisition Officer’s Council is asking for feedback on reporting and compliance, procurement rules, and barriers to participation in federal contracting by small companies as well as those who traditionally don’t do business with government.  They are asking the questions many of us ask too – and they’ve provided an opportunity for many voices to be heard.  Let’s work with the Council to create an acquisition environment where our government benefits from our best while reducing costs, improving delivery times, leading innovation and technology, and build outstanding products for those who keep us safe. 

Visit the Office of the Chief Acquisition Officer’s Council website to learn more and to submit your comments on how you would change the acquisition process.

All comments are due by May 5, 2014.

 

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AIA Conflict Minerals Education Update

April 24, 2014

This document serves to inform AIA members and their supply chains about the first round of pending Conflict Minerals Specialized Disclosure filings to the SEC. With the complicated nature of the Conflict Minerals Report format and audit protocol, AIA has prepared this document as a training guide to help answer some of the most common questions about the process.

In addition, based on the AIA Conflict Minerals Working Group Charter, this training document completes one of key goals of this collective group. In order to provide our member companies and their supply chains with the necessary guidance, we have released this information broadly to allow for review and consider prior to the SEC filing deadline of June 2, 2014 for the first Conflict Minerals Specialized Disclosure.

Download:

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2014 Executive Report First Quarter

April 17, 2014

The Executive Report is an AIA quarterly publication which provides news and information about our association membership, AIA initiatives and events, and other information from around the industry.

Featured this quarter in the Executive Report:

  • President's Message: Next Steps for Second to None
  • Q & A With With Michael T. Strianese, Chairman, AIA, and Chairman, President and CEO, L-3
  • AIA/NAS 3D Digital Standards Gaining Market Traction
  • Team America Rocketry Challenge: Bridging the Gap for Women in STEM Since 2002

 

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AIA Encouraged by Meeting Among SASC Members on Sequestration

April 10, 2014

Statement by Aerospace Industries Association President and CEO Marion C. Blakey on the meeting of Senate Armed Services Committee members to discuss solutions to sequestration budget cuts.

Arlington, Va. — The Aerospace Industries Association is encouraged by the news that members of the Senate Armed Services Committee are meeting to discuss solutions to the threat posed to our national security by indiscriminate budget cuts under sequestration during fiscal years 2016 through 2019.  Senior Pentagon leaders have repeatedly warned that failure to address sequestration would impact readiness, troop levels and modernization, leading to an unacceptable loss in military capabilities.  The Quadrennial Defense Review released last month states that defense is underfunded by $115 billion in that timeframe.

AIA has warned for years that these caps will force bad choices at a time of increasing global instability.  We must make smart decisions regarding our country’s vital national security interests.  We commend Senator Angus King’s (I-Maine) leadership in calling for this series of bipartisan meetings among the group of senators most intimately in tune with our nation’s armed forces and national security needs.  We hope that the exchange of proposals in these meetings leads to a budget agreement that sets aside sequestration and protects the investments our nation needs to make to preserve our military capabilities and the industrial base that equips our warfighters.

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Business transactions standards

April 09, 2014

The standards define a set of common business transactions in the ANSI X.12 format, profiling the general standards for use in the aerospace and defense environment.

These standards will soon be sold through the IHS portal.

 

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Exchange Agreements

April 09, 2014

e-Agreements provide global parties with a common set of rules by which they agree to exchange electronic data or to collaborate electronically. These rules supplement the basic underlying agreements for goods, services or collaborative efforts providing a framework for electronic trading and collaboration. Use of a standard template provides benefits to both Prime and Supplier. The terms and conditions in these templates can be reused by all Parties eliminating the need to re-negotiate independent terms and conditions for every new situation.

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Architecture Standards

April 09, 2014

Architectural standards are intended to support the design and implementation of eBusiness solutions.

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Product Data Standards

April 09, 2014

These standards provide the capability to exchange engineering information between different organizations, computer systems and functions in the aerospace and defense environment.

Aerospace Industry Guidelines for Implementing Interoperability Standards for Engineering Data

These guidelines provide strategic and tactical guidance for the adoption by industry of a common standard-based information backbone for engineering data, using the ISO 10303-239 (PLCS) standard. This will enable interoperability for product definition data across the aerospace industry supply network and throughout the product life cycle, from design and production to consumption and operation, reducing the cost, risk and complexity and increasing the speed of working with suppliers and partners at any level.

Download the document

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E-Business Documents

April 09, 2014
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E-Business

April 09, 2014

All participants in the aerospace value chain should be able to exchange information relative to product design, business relationships, transactions, and product support across an information backbone which is open and accessible to all. 

To achieve this, AIA has, through industry agreements, helped eliminate the need for common IT tool adoptions across the industry. The AIA eBusiness center provides a single source for industry recommended solutions to online buiness interoperability which identify standards-based approach to components that help eliminate the cost of developing individual point-to-point solutions and delivering business benefits to prime contractors and suppliers.

The recommendations for eBusiness are maintained by AIA's Electronic Enterprise Integration Committee (EEIC), and chartered jointly by the eBusiness Steering Group and the Supplier Management Council. The methodology and framework for recommendationas being made is described in detail in the AIA eBusiness Implementation Guidebook.

The defined business scenarios and recommended solution components are below and enumerated in the e-Business subpages.

Solution Components

The EEIC Radar Chart (Powerpoint required to view) provides a simple reference for the various technology standards and initiatives that are under the attention of the EEIC.
EEIC Radar Chart

The radar chart illustrates the maturity of the recommendation for each standard or initiative, with the outer ring populated by work that is being actively tracked by the EEIC, the inner ring showing work that is a candidate for adoption as part of the eBusiness Framework, and the central circle showing components that have been adopted as AIA recommendations.

The four quadrants of the chart show the AIA strategy for each component. In decreasing order of preference, the strategies include:

  • Adopt existing standard
  • Monitor external development - where the development is intended to deliver a necessary component
  • Participate in external development - where the work needs to be steered to meet AIA needs
  • AIA development - where no appropriate external tasks can be leveraged to meet our needs

The following standards and initiatives have been adopted, or are under consideration:

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AIA C-TPAT Supplier Database

April 04, 2014

AIA member companies have cooperated to develop and implement a program that will assist your company, other international aerospace suppliers, and U.S. importers in complying with U.S. Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) supply chain security goals while minimizing the impact and effort needed, particularly for international suppliers with multiple U.S. customers.

International suppliers to AIA companies benefit from participation in AIA's C-TPAT Initiative with a reduced paperwork burden and a venue for suppliers to market a competitive advantage to potential customers in the United States.
 

Benefits of Participation

Benefits of completing the AIA C-TPAT Self-Assessment Questionnaire include:

  • Your company can complete a single security questionnaire and provide it to multiple customers rather than completing a separate questionnaire for each
  • Your company will retain control of all questionnaire data and security information and only provide it to your customers when requested
  • Your company will be visibly listed in AIA's database, demonstrating your company's C-TPAT commitment to current and potential customers
  • A competitive business advantage in confirming your company's C-TPAT compliance to current and future customers

 

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Aero Caucus Hosts DARPA Director & Industry Displays

April 02, 2014

On April 1, 2014, Aerospace Caucus co-chairs, Senators Patty Murray and Saxby Chambliss, hosted an event on the importance of defense research and development (R&D) on innovation. The event featured Dr. Arati Prabhakar the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), who spoke to the innovations that have entered the commercial marketplace because of defense R&D investments.

Far left: Sen. Murray (D-WA) discusses ATM technology with Rockwell Collins representative.  Left: Sen. Chambliss (R-GA) shakes hands with UTC representative in front of a display model ejection seat.

The caucus event also featured industry R&D partners who had some of their innovative technologies on display. These displays included technologies such as satellite air traffic management, ejection seats and GPS equipment from aerospace and defense manufactures ATK, Harris Corp., Honeywell, Rockwell Collins and UTC.

AIA President and CEO Marion C. Blakey

“The tangible benefits we’ve obtained from healthy federal investment in R&D programs yield strong economic growth and significant technological advances,” said AIA’s President and CEO, Marion C. Blakey, as she opened the event. “Many of these technology innovations improve our everyday life through advances in cell phone and automobile capabilities, life saving medical science equipment and consumer electronics.”

The spinoffs made possible through defense related R&D are also highlighted in AIA’s latest report, Defense Research and Development: From the Warfighter to the American Consumer, Redefining Everyday Lives Through Innovation.

“We can’t afford to sacrifice these investments, and we can’t afford to lose our global leadership in innovation,” said Senator Murray.  “If we were a business the last place we would look to cut back is where our future economic growth will be coming from, which is exactly what R&D represents.”

Senator Murray’s recognition of the need for further investment in R&D spending was followed by calling for more budgetary certainty in federal spending to ensure national security capabilities, strengthen the economy, and “close the innovation deficit.”

In the aerospace and defense marketplace it is innovation through R&D that has allowed the United States to stay ahead of its global competition and enabled it to respond to security threats around the world.

“The threats [we face as a nation] demand unconventional solutions,” said Senator Chambliss acknowledging  America’s need to promote innovative ideas across borders, disciplines, institutions and ideologies. “We have to think, prepare, research, and build not just for the world we are in, but for the world that we will be in tomorrow and beyond.”

Senator Chambliss went on to discuss the need to provide the Defense Department with a more streamlined acquisition process that provides for better partnerships between government and industry; citing DARPA as an agency who has lead the way in delivering innovative technologies through strong industry partnerships. These partnerships have helped lead the way for the future.

DARPA Director, Dr. Arati Prabhakar

“Through more than five decades of tumultuous geopolitical and technological change, [DARPA] delivered outsized impact by focusing on our mission of breakthrough technologies for national security,” said DARPA’s Director, Dr. Prabhakar, speaking to the imaginative processes that have enabled the agency to advance new technologies for defense applications.

How the agency is approaching today’s national security problems also requires a rethink according to Dr. Prabhakar. The agency is looking to achieve far greater capabilities at lower cost by rethinking the next generation of defense systems, incorporating information at scale, looking to biology for technological and human understanding, and keeping an eye on the next horizon in defense technologies.

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Aero Caucus Hosts DARPA & Industry

April 02, 2014

On April 1, 2014, Aerospace Caucus co-chairs, Senators Patty Murray and Saxby Chambliss, hosted an event on the importance of defense research and development (R&D) on innovation. The event featured Dr. Arati Prabhakar the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), who spoke....