Aerospace Industry Sales

Aerospace Industry Sales

Even in a depressed economy aerospace sales hit a recorded high 215.2 billion dollars in 2009, a 4% increase over 2008 sales. The Missiles market segment lead the record year with a 10% increase in sales followed closely by military aircraft. All market segments exhibit growth of 2% or more with the exception of the related products segment, which saw an 8% decrease in sales in 2009.  For more information, see Series 02.

Aerospace Orders, Shipments & Backlog

Aerospace Orders, Shipments & Backlog

Shipment numbers have been steadily rising in the aerospace industry since 2003—2009 was no exception. The aerospace industry shipped 206 billion dollars worth of products in 2009. Shipments may have gone up, but new orders and backlog slipped from record highs recorded in 2008 and 2009. Backlog numbers dropped slightly to 362 billion dollars. New Order numbers fell harder to 166 billion dollars. For more information, see Series 26A, B and C.

Aerospace Employment

Aerospace Employment

In 2009 US employment dropped by 4% in comparison to 2008. In the same span of time employment in the Guided Missiles, Space Vehicles, and Parts sector of the aerospace industry increased its employment levels by 1% and the overall aerospace industry employment dropped by 2%. The most significant drop took place in the Aircraft and Parts segment which fell off over 3%.  For more information, see Group 2: Employment.

R&D Scientists and Engineers

R&D Scientists and Engineers

In the mid-1980s, one out of five research and development scientists and engineers was employed in the aerospace industry. That portion fell to 3.3% in 2007, the latest year's data available from the National Science Foundation. Likewise, the numbers of R&D scientists and engineers has fallen from nearly 145,000 in 1986 to a low of 19,100 in 2002 before recovering. Scientists and engineers hurdle the technological challenges and bring awe-inspiring new products and innovations to life.

Aerospace Foreign Trade

Aerospace Foreign Trade

The aerospace industry’s trade balance was over $56 billion in 2009. The industry recorded over 80 billion dollars in exports and imports shrunk to 33 billion dollars; these numbers are still dwarfed by the record setting years the industry experienced from 2006 to 2008. For more information, see Series 31 and 32.

Foreign Trade by Industry

Foreign Trade by Industry

The aerospace industry’s trade balance was over $56 billion in 2009. The industry recorded over 80 billion dollars in exports and imports shrunk to 33 billion dollars; these numbers are still dwarfed by the record setting years the industry experienced from 2006 to 2008. For more information, see Series 31 and 32.

Top Aerospace Trade Partners

Top Aerospace Trade Partners

France became the strongest importer of US aerospace products in 2009 importing 8.2 billion dollars of goods. Other big importers include the United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan. The US aerospace industry recorded a trade deficient with both France and Canada in 2009, importing over nearly half of all aerospace imports from these two countries alone.

Unsolved - The Continuing Saga of Lead-Free Electronics in Aerospace, Defense and High Performance P

Unsolved - The Continuing Saga of Lead-Free Electronics in Aerospace, Defense and High Performance Products

European Directive 2002/95/EC on the Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) and the Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) Directive (2002/96/EC)ii have changed the global supply chain for materials used in aerospace products. The result of this market shift is of high concern for our industry, forcing the transition away from tin-lead alloys used in the assembly and coating for high performance electronics known as lead-free (Pb-free) electronics.

Aerospace Industry Guidelines for Implimenting Interoperability Standards for Engineering Data

Aerospace Industry Guidelines for Implimenting Interoperability Standards for Engineering Data

The variety of engineering tools used to support design, procurement, manufacturing, and support of aerospace products has never been greater. From company to company, tools and processes range from manual capture in 2D drawings to sophisticated 3D models that are tightly integrated with other enterprise systems - this guide helps provide a standard approach to work across the range of processes.

Continuing Quest for Quieter Aircraft

Continuing Quest for Quieter Aircraft

Modern day jet aircraft are more fuel efficient and quieter than ever before.  In the past 40 years jet aircraft have not only gained 70 percent greater fuel efficiency but are also about 90 percent quieter than their predecessors.  In the meantime, air traffic continues to increase – predicted to double by the year 2030 – while aircraft noise and emissions that affect local air quality and global climate will increase only modestly, through industry efforts such as the commitment to carbon neutral growth after the year 2020.

2013 Year-End Review and Forecast

2013 Year-End Review and Forecast

The U.S. aerospace and defense industry is facing some of its greatest challenges in decades. While weathering numerous trials during 2013, our industry produced relatively flat results compared with 2012. An overall slight decrease in sales is forecast, reaching $220.1 billion for 2013 – down from $222 billion last year – with only civil aircraft sales showing growth. Sequestration effects on the industry and Defense Department have forced industry layoffs and divestitures and will continue to put pressure on the fragile industrial base.

NAS Standards Brochure

For even more details about NAS and the AIA standards series, you may download the brochure.

Sustaining the U.S. Defense Industrial Base

AIA Industrial Base Issue Paper

Commercial Items - Equipping Our Service Members with the Best

Commercial Items - Equipping Our Service Members with the Best

Using commercial items provides the Department of Defense (DOD) with distinct military advantages – access to a wide array of technologies and products developed through industry investment, generally at a lower cost and with a quicker turn-around time than through traditional acquisition programs.  Commercial purchases allow for faster insertion of technologies, lower life cycle costs and greater access to – and support from – the vast array of companies that make up the U.S. civil and military industrial base.

Sequester, Defense Budgets and the Industrial Base

Sequester, Defense Budgets and the Industrial Base

Mandatory budget cuts will dramatically and disproportionately reduce the Defense Department’s modernization accounts, which will damage the industrial base more severely than is commonly believed. The reasons for this that are enumerated in the paper include: The effects of sequester in 2013 were mitigated; Modernization funding, though roughly one-third of the defense budget, will likely absorb nearly half the cuts in sequester’s early years; and DOD is taking a "modernzation holiday"by committing between 15 and 20 percent less to needed programs.

NextGen: Proven Technology. Endangered Potential

NextGen: Proven Technology. Endangered Potential

Budget cuts are undermining the United States' ability to fully implement the Next Generation Air Transportation System known as NextGen. This delayed implementation is slowing air travel efficiencies, compounding safety concerns and contributing to unnecessary environmental noise and air pollution. With U.S. air travel expected to grow by 19 percent by 2018, it is necessary to maintain the implementation of NextGen.

State of the Defense Budget

State of the Defense Budget

Implementation of the Budget Control Act of 2011 is having severe adverse impacts on the defense budget. In real dollar terms, DOD investment spending (Procurement and R&D) in fiscal year 2013 is 24 percent less than it was in fiscal year 2011, the year before the Budget Control Act. Unless the act is changed, fiscal year 2014 could see another 14 percent reduction in investment spending.

Disruptive Information Technologies: Leveraging the benefits, avoiding the pitfalls

Disruptive Information Technologies: Leveraging the benefits, avoiding the pitfalls

This republished special report states the likely impact of specific high powered colaborative technologies on business, technical, cultural, operational and security for our industry. The key characteristics of each technology are described in the report along with the benefits, risks and mitigations. Each section provides recommendations to help companies exploit the technologies and proposes where appropriate including where AIA may act on behalf of the industry.

Radio Frequency Identification: Business scenarios that can benefit from the application of RFID

Radio Frequency Identification: Business scenarios that can benefit from the application of RFID

The AIA eBusiness Steering Group commissioned this report to identify the business scenarios where RFID could be effectively deployed in the aerospace and defense industry, based on growing industry experience of RFID in real applications. The report identifies some key successful applications in pilot and production environments, the lessons learned and challenges still remaining, and the most significant enhancements to the technology.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Perceptions and Potential

Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Perceptions and Potential

This report attempts both to define unmanned aircraft systems properly and to demystify their applications. It also explores
the societal benefits presented by their domestic use, and the policy priorities that must be addressed in order to keep the United States in its leading position in global UAS technology.

Policies and Codes of Conduct for the Use of Social Networks: Leveraging the Benefits…

Policies and Codes of Conduct for the Use of Social Networks: Leveraging the Benefits...

This report defines the key issues to be addressed when considering the use of social networking tools within an organization, in a controlled community and in a public environment. It also recommends that the content of policies and codes of conduct for the use of social media should be integrated with existing policies and codes of conduct related to computer usage and network access.

Cloud Computing: a Report on Cloud Computing used in the Aerospace and Defense Industry

Cloud Computing: a Report on Cloud Computing used in the Aerospace and Defense Industry

This paper explores the various applications of Cloud Computing used by industry and government. Based on the experience to date, it identifies the latest benefits, risks and business impacts of Cloud Computing, with particular reference to portability and interoperability.